Archive for the ‘Art Gallery’ Category

Stills, Far From Dead

November 2, 2014 in Art,Art Gallery,Clifford T. Bailey,Colorado,Janelle Cox,Oils | Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Still Life

16×12 Still Life by Greg Custer

He’s busy. He’s teaching. He’s working on new work for Hunter-Wolff Gallery! There’s little downtime in the life of an artist.His name is Greg Custer and like many artists, Greg is happy to let someone else name his paintings.  His newest painting (left) is beautiful and deserves a beautiful name. Greg asked that we name his painting so it doesn’t have to hang on the wall called “Still Life”. We are happy to accept ideas from our readers, too.

Did you know that a still life painting is the study of inanimate objects (referred to a nature morte which is a French term meaning dead nature)? Often, the objects are ordinary, everyday objects that anyone might recognize. Still lifes are often groupings that include floral arrangements, fruit, vegetables, kitchenware, and more. But, perhaps even more importantly, a key feature of still life art work is the degree of control that the artist can exercise over the work. The elements that make up a still life are grouped or positioned by the artist. Lighting is also an important element in a still to create a mood. Still life painting can be seen to be a relatively pure, even abstract, form of art.

While still life painting can be traced back to the ancient Egyptians, it was only with the Dutch painters of the 17th century that it came into its own as a painting genre. Still life artists of the 19th century such as Cezanne, Renoir, Fantin-Latour and, in the United States, Raphaelle Peale took still life painting in new directions.

Stills remain a popular genre and often found in art collections to some degree. Highly popular Hunter-Wolff Gallery artists who specialize in this genre include Greg Custer, Clifford T. Bailey, Janelle Cox, Justin Clements, and more.

We look forward to learning if you are a collector or fan of still life paintings. Send us your comments.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

No Ordinary Bird

October 28, 2014 in Art,Art Gallery,Artists | Comments (0)

Tags: , , , , ,

Male Cardinal by Larry Szabelski

Did you know that the Cardinal is the only red bird in Eastern North America?  On average it lives 3-9 years but has been reported to live as long as 15 years. You can read some interesting facts on a number of web sites including http://on.natgeo.com/TcyAB1.  What does this have to do with Hunter-Wolff Gallery?

Many artists are inspired by nature and there are few birds more colorful than the Cardinal to be inspired by. Wood-carver Larry Szabelski has carved blue birds, sharp-shinned hawks, sparrows, chickadees, warblers, and more but none take the spotlight like the cardinal.

Larry uses a hardwood called jelutong, which is a species of tree in the oleander subfamily.  This tree grows over 200′ tall and sometimes measures 5-6′ in diameter and is found in low-elevation tropical evergreen forests like southern Thailand. He also uses acrylic paints for color and glass eyes and other natural elements to keep his sculpture as realistic as possible.  This particular carving was further embellished with a wood-carved  morning glory flower  that took over 18 hours to carve.

To see more of Larry Szabelski’s life-like birds, stop in at Hunter-Wolff Gallery in Old Colorado City, just minutes from downtown Colorado Springs, or visit Larry’s  webpage at http://bit.ly/WPDB8Q

 

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Party With A Flare

October 19, 2014 in Art,Art Gallery,Colorado,Events,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City | Comments (0)

Tags: , , ,

WineRoses2_tn IMG_0661_tnTable_tnLooking for a party space that is beautiful and not going to cost you an arm and a leg? Your business or corporation can reserve Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s space for an intimate evening in a beautiful setting.  If you have a group of friends or want to do something extraordinary for that special someone, Hunter-Wolff Gallery has the perfect setting for an evening.  We can make recommendations for local caterers and entertainment. Surrounded by fine artwork, you will get your message across that says, “I appreciate you (or your business) and look forward to a long and rewarding relationship.” Hunter-Wolff Gallery can get as creative as you like to help make your evening memorable and meaningful. We have lots of suggestions for dining, wine, flowers, and entertainers like Randy Rodriquez. We can even have an artist on site to do a live demonstration or create a portrait of your honoree.  Call 719-520-9494 and let us help you started planning a special evening.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Affordable. Durable. Practical.

October 4, 2014 in American Made,Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Pottery | Comments (0)

Tags: , , , ,

TH1259traycup_tn TH-Red_tn TH1395_tn TH_oil cruets_tnComfort food–the ultimate hug for the soul this time of year! Even though Hunter-Wolff Gallery doesn’t sell comfort food, you can find Colorado-made pottery for serving your favorite meals for that ultimate hug. Tony Heslop, a fine potter in Colorado Springs, creates an array of colorful, practical tableware for everyday living. Everyday doesn’t mean not special!

Tony’s “pots” are a feast for the eyes and when you add your own home-cooked recipes, it is a combo your family and guests will come back for more. There is nothing like filling the kitchen with the smell of home baked bread and pastries and a bubbling treat on the stove or crock-pot and serving it up on beautiful clayware.

Fans have been collecting Tony’s work for nearly 40 years and several generations of cooks keep adding pieces to their own collections and for gifts. Each year he adds new designs, colors and shapes and his work continues to evolve to keep the kitchen kings and queens happy. His glazes are food safe and kitchen-friendly because they work in the microwave, dishwasher and oven. If you like adding a bottle wine to the table, check out his wine chiller. Place it in the freezer for a few hours and then on the table and your white wine and champagne will stay chilled throughout the meal, and they are so affordable, you might add several to the table.

When you are looking for a wedding, anniversary, or shower gifts, and have a modest budget, consider finding something special from the Tony Heslop pottery collection. We know the gift will be welcomed and cherished for years to come.

Buy local. Buy American. Buy treasures for a lifetime.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Collecting Small for Big Impact

September 26, 2014 in American Made,Art,Art Gallery,Art Glass,Colorado,Miniature oils,Paintings | Comments (0)

RufousGem4x4

4×4 Rufous Hummingbird by Patrice Walker

Pika Pair Bronze by Fred Lunger

Pika Pair Bronze by Fred Lunger

7.25x7.25 Fused Glass on Glass Painitng by Gary Vigen

7.25×7.25 Fused Glass on
Glass Painitng by Gary Vigen

Miniatures are a genre that is often overlooked. For collectors, small-scale can be so charming and easy to fit into almost any size home, apartment or studio.

The White House and Smithsonian both have impressive collections. Why not you? Hunter-Wolff Gallery features miniatures and small-scale art by award-winning artists, some who specialize in miniatures following all the criteria necessary for juried shows and competitions. One can always find room for a 4×4 Patrice Walker painting, or a pair of Pika bronzes by  Fred Lunger or small fused glass painting by Gary Vigen. These award-winning artists are some of many who offer art-lovers with limited space options to collect prized art.

Miniature painting involves tedious and delicate brushwork that captivates under close scrutiny.  A visit to Hunter-Wolff Gallery might surprise visitors the number of options, sizes and mediums for which small-scale art can be found.  Consider miniatures for your tabletop or display shelves.  They are also affordable and easier to rearrange as new artwork comes into your home and your collection continues to grow.

If you collect miniatures, we’d like to know how you got started and how you display your collection.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Tips for Hanging Wall Art

September 6, 2014 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Colorado,Fine Art,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City,Paintings | Comments (0)

Tags: , ,

BaileyWall_tnDoes the simple task of hanging artwork seem like a daunting project and you wish someone would do it for you? You have your ladder and a dozen tools, measuring tape and marker but can’t seem to decide if it should go higher or lower? If you follow a few key steps, you will be admiring your new work from the sofa in no time. First, tell Hubby to leave the room unless he promises to be helpful.

Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s designer friends tell us they work to develop a relationship between the wall and the art. In other words, think about the way the art is hung in relationship to the architectural design of the wall and room. For DIYs, we suggest a simple method by determining the spacing for hanging a group of art.

Begin with measuring the available space on the wall. Account for any furniture against the wall and mark with painter’s tape between 5 ½ to 5¾ feet (universal eye-level height) from the floor.

Next, arrange an odd number of paintings together. For a mixed collection of art; i.e., a group of pastels, photos or children’s drawings, one might experiment by hanging them in a lyrical way, up and down like musical notes, keeping the mean level at 5 1/2 feet. To achieve balance with a group of pieces that are different in size and scale, some experts suggest visualizing an imaginary axis vertically and horizontally on the wall. Then place the pieces to achieve an equal weight and balance in each of the four quadrants.

Finish by lining up the centers of all the pictures for display and create an arrangement on the floor or flat surface, starting from the center of the grouping and working outward.

For a single piece of art, think of the wall in terms of quarters, thirds, halves, etc., in determining the placement of the piece on the wall. Accurately measure the proportions , both horizontally and vertically. In a room with a 9-foot ceiling, for example, we advise that the chair rail should be at 3 feet (one-third), leaving 6 feet above for the painting. With the center of the work at the 6-foot mark, it would be proportionately in the center of the top of the space. When in doubt, ask Hunter-Wolff Gallery for advice or if you are located in the Colorado Springs area, ask if we can come to your home to hang your artwork for a small fee!

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Your Pathway to Learning

August 29, 2014 in American Made,Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Justin Clements oils,Oils,Old Colorado City,Paintings,Personal Development | Comments (0)

Tags: , , ,

OnionsAGlass Bottle12x161Artists are inspired by all sorts of things that can lead them down a new path causing a change or improvement in their style. One of Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s up and coming artists Justin Clements, recently delivered a  dozen or so new paintings that grabbed my attention.  I noticed he was doing something new with bits of color that looked like confetti over his painting.  This new addition to his work has an interesting effect and I  specifically asked  about the little pieces of color. At first, he smiled and was pleased I noticed but  didn’t have a ready answer.

After leaving to return to his studio, he  started  thinking about my probing question and realized something that had not occurred to him before. The last six months or so Justin had been studying the French impressionist movement and, specifically, the timeless works of Claude Monet. Monet’s work truly moved him and had a profound affect on Justin. Although several days had gone by, Justin contacted me to let me know he believed studying Monet’s style  influenced him to look at problems of light and color in a new way. Justin thanked me for noticing the tiny change that made such a big difference in his work and mentioning the detail that lead to this fun realization.

You never know where, when or how your questions might trigger deeper thought.  This is what art does.  Original art makes us think and stimulate conversation.  Take time today to look deeply at a piece of original art and see if you can come up with several questions for the artist or owner of the art.  You never know what path your question will take you. Learning about art is fun. See more new original paintings today at Hunter-Wolff Gallery.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Buying Art? Use Good Judgement

in American Made,Art,art education,Art Gallery,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City,Paintings | Comments (0)

moneyBuying art, like buying any major purchase, is not without its risks. How do you know the price paid is actually a true reflection of its worth? The better way to assess value is to consider how the art you are considering makes you feel on a deeper emotional or intellectual level. When a piece jogs a memory or evokes something pleasant, it becomes meaningful and the value can be measured by how it makes you feel. Aside from affordability, your choice should consider whether it will be a pleasure for you day in and day out.  If these considerations are made, you are likely to make the right choice regardless of the artist’s fame or price tag.

If purchasing outside a reputable gallery, there is a possibility that the artwork is not authentic or it could even be a stolen piece. Purchasing a stolen piece could turn a joyous occasion into the loss of a lot of money and the piece being reclaimed by authorities. There is an Art Loss Register service based in Amsterdam, Cologne, New York and Paris, where pieces can be checked. More than 200,000 works of stolen art reside in the ALR database.  This registry not only stores famous pieces but includes works of less celebrity. Of course, searching the database cannot guarantee that a piece is not stolen. Working through a reputable gallery or art broker could save a lot of headaches.  Reputable galleries, auction houses and brokers know the history of pieces before offering them for sale.  Always be sure to check with your local galleries and take some time to build a relationship with its owner and staff.  Like any other service provider for your home, it is beneficial to know who you are doing business with and to work with local small businesses. More information about buying art and regional artists can be learned from Hunter-Wolff Gallery at www.hunterwolffgallery.com or by calling 719-520-9494

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

How Did They Do That?

August 4, 2014 in Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Pottery,Raku,textured | Comments (0)

Tags: , ,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWith more than 30 years experience in visual media, Marc Jenesel is a graphic artist and animator but dedicates every available moment for his passion creating Raku. His signature pots, ‘Glow Pots’, truly glow from the interior and the first response seeing them in person is, “Is there a candle in there?”.

No candles, trick lighting or any other  light sources are added to make Marc’s Glow Pots glow.   They are beautifully created by an accomplished potter, Marc Jenesel, then fired at 1800 degrees, removed from the kiln at their maximum temperature, cooled and embellished with layers of copper leaf which catch the ambient light fork a beautiful soft glow.  Before bringing his finished products to Hunter-Wolff Gallery, there are a number of steps in between, quality control checks are made and only perfect pots are delivered. The waiting is well worth it.

Through his science background and experience, he is able to obtain the range of textures and glaze colors using chemistry and post-firing reduction. He explains, “Much of my education is in the sciences. I believe art and science run parallel. As science has become more abstract and out there, so has art. I think a well-rounded education in the arts requires some study of the sciences.” His results are remarkable and formulated for rich color and texture before they are made available to collectors. Stop in and visit Hunter-Wolff Gallery in Old Colorado City, Colorado Springs, and discover how Marc creates Raku pottery like no other potter.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Beauty from Devastation

August 2, 2014 in Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,trees | Comments (0)

Tags: , , , , , , ,

BLKFtreeThe last two years have been trying for many Coloradans in the Colorado Springs area because of terrible wildfires.  At the time, it was hard not to think constantly about all the devastation and wonder how people directly affected would get through it.  The summer of 2014 is quite different for most residents in this area because of better weather conditions and lots of rain—almost daily.  But it is still hard to see the thousands of burned trees and chared hillsides where the flora and fauna once flourished.

Out of all that devastation, a creative artist and woodturner named Vinny Luciani at Hunter-Wolff Gallery has taken something so horrible and made something beautiful.  With salvaged Ponderosa Pine from the 2013 Black Forest fire, he makes lovely little tree ornaments.  His little trees include burned and unburned sections of the tree and are accented with crushed turquoise from one of Colorado’s turquoise mines in Cripple Creek.  These little jewels are a reminder of how quickly our natural resources can be devastated and how important it is to stay hopeful about the future.

We hope you have a safe summer and always return to find the home you love exactly the way you left it.  More information about Vinny Luciani’s Christmas tree ornaments can be found at our website or by calling 719-520-9494 during normal business hours.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter