Archive for the ‘art education’ Category

Essential to the Human Spirit

February 12, 2017 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Color,Colorado,Fine Art,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Oils,Old Colorado City,Paintings,Personal Development,PTSD | Comments (0)

arthumanspiritBecause I own an art gallery, I am often asked if I am an artist. No, but I love art and value art creators. I have been passionate about art since I could hold a crayon in my hand.  By the time I entered high school, I was hooked and collecting was most satisfying to me. I started collecting glass and small paintings on trips outside the country. Then I took a closer look at local artists and changed my focus. Today, my passion for art takes me wherever I can find it, to writing about it, and to working closely with artists and those who want to learn.

I’ve written and read dozens of articles about why art is important in our lives and talked about how it impacts our lives. In spite of my passion, I believe more people misunderstand art than those who appreciate it.  Art has been important to mankind since the first cave man etched in stone and continues to be used for purposes beyond creativity, self-expression, and communication.

What I love most about art is that it brings people together.  I’ve never heard of art starting a war, committing a violent act against another person, transmitting a deadly disease or hating its viewer because of some prejudice. Art welcomes your stares and dialog. Art doesn’t care if you can speak the language of the artist; it does not discriminate. It isn’t concerned if you have limitations, acute senses or not, are educated, successful, rich or poor. People with opposite beliefs, from different cultures, having different abilities can all appreciate the same work of art or dismiss it. Art is here for everyone to engage in and enjoy, using one’s own aptitude and skill. Let’s not forget, today art is more affordable than ever before and can be purchased and enjoyed in our homes and the workplace. It is more easily acquired than any time in history.

There are so many reasons why Art is important and essential to the human spirit. It can serve as therapy and heal broken lives. Art affects us all in different ways and only you can determine its value. It can transport us to the past and launch us into the future. The connection we make with a piece of art is sometimes surprising and can be life-changing.

It is impossible to experience art without experiencing values of home and family, work and play, the individual and community, nature and the environment, war and peace, beauty and ugliness, pain and love. At Hunter-Wolff Gallery we bring you art that you can experience and value in your own special way. We look forward to hearing how art is important in your life and what plans you have to bring it into your life in 2017.

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In Memoriam Gary Vigen

January 2, 2017 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Fine Art,Honors,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City,Paintings,stained glass | Comments (0)

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Today it is with great sadness that we say good-bye to one of the finest artists and men I had the pleasure of knowing. Gary Vigen will be sorely missed by all who knew him, his family, friends, his fellow artists and so many art enthusiasts who enjoyed his art for more than 50 years. Gary was a friend who followed his passion creating fine art and became one of Colorado’s  preeminent  stained glass artists.

gary_painting_mediumI had the pleasure of meeting Gary 11 years ago as I started up my art gallery in Colorado Springs. By then he had already been working in his complex medium for nearly 50 years and had been long admired by his fellow artists. Gary was one of the original, core artists represented at Hunter-Wolff Gallery and became a good friend and sounding board. This incredibly talented man also had the gift to reach children with learning disabilities and taught for more than 30 years. After retirement, he continued to follow his passion to work with glass and made time to teach adults the joy of working with stained glass.

Hunter-Wolff Gallery will continue to offer Gary Vigen’s work until its limited inventory is depleted. You can read more about Gary in Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s Insider News, November 2016 , our November featured artist and on our website.

Farewell Gary.  You will always be remembered for your friendship and incredible talent.

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Pastel Passion

August 1, 2016 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Marlene Kort,Paintings | Comments (0)

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Pastels_boxSince August is “American Artists Appreciation” month Hunter-Wolff Gallery selected one of its fine pastel painters, Marlene Kort, to honor this month.

Marlene works primarily with Pastels.  Rather than using oil paint, brushes, solvents and other liquids, she selects her color sticks of ground pigment mixed with a  binder. Shaped into drawing (painting) sticks, she layers and blends using her fingers. Pastels cannot be mixed on a palette like paints, but are mixed on a toothy paper similar to sandpaper by overlaying or blending colors. The color stays brilliant.

Although artists have been using pastels since the Renaissance, they did not become popular until the 18th century. Works created by numerous notable artists, including Edgar Degas, an innovator in the pastel technique, can be found in museums and look as fresh and vibrant as if created in more modern times.
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Pastel is a very flexible medium and durable. It can be brushed off or erased. It can be blended or layered. It is typical to blend colors with a finger. Finished pieces are best placed under museum-quality glass to eliminate glare, protect against UV light rays and preserve a painting for a lifetime! Consider a pastel painting by Marlene Kort at Hunter-Wolff Gallery the next time you shop for art. It will remain vibrant for generations and by framing with top-quality museum glass will be appreciated for a lifetime.
Many examples of Marlene’s available work for ownership can be viewed on our website . For more information about Marlene and her passions, click to read Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s August 2016 gallery’s newsletter.
Hunter-Wolff Gallery always has someone on staff to help with questions about art techniques, purchasing,
shipping, and other area’s of interest.  719-520-9494.
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Ten Exciting Years

October 31, 2015 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Colorado,Fine Art,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Oils,Old Colorado City,Paintings | Comments (0)

AnniversaryHappy 10th Anniversary Hunter-Wolff Gallery!  It sounds strange to hear these words, because when I started on this journey I thought being in the art business for few years would be fun.  There were so many unknowns at the time Hunter-Wolff Gallery opened its doors.  With only corporate business experience, I felt like I landed  in a “foreign country”.  It was hard to think beyond what was important on any given day or week but I wanted to do something challenging and fun for a few years.  Well, the fun kept coming and the challenges became less so.

Taking responsibility for my own business has been one of the most demanding, yet rewarding, endeavors in my life.  This was a challenge that would affect so many people, an entire community.  I knew from the start this is where I belonged.  Ten years later, I still enjoy what I do, even on the less than perfect days.

Because Hunter-Wolff Gallery has represented as many as 40 artists in a given year, we made a lot of friends.  Some artists come and some go; just like any other business. But I leave you with this reminder, do what you love, do it well, and the rewards will always be there for you.

Check out our monthly newsletters and learn about our featured artists and exhibits. Be sure to add to your calendar Friday, November 6 to meet dozens of fine artists and to help us celebrate this wonderful milestone.

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Getting Help Collecting

October 4, 2015 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City | Comments (0)

DSC07800Taking time to build an art collection that reflect your taste and fits your style is worth every effort. You have to explore and discover what you like about each piece you encounter.

The best place to start your search for fine art is at a reputable gallery. Galleries are specialists and have relationships with many artists working in many different styles. They know about trends and are eager to help.  When working with a gallery, you will gain knowledge about the art you are drawn to from the gallery personnel. Even if you are accustomed to shopping online, take time to visit a gallery and give them a chance to show you what they offer and learn what they know about their artists. If you have a good experience, you know you are working with the right experts.

When you start working with an art gallery and they don’t respond to your needs, let them know you are disappointed in their service and move on to another gallery.  Galleries don’t just sell art, they are there to share their expertise, to educate, to enlighten, to inspire, and to offer ideas and suggestions.  At Hunter-Wolff Gallery, we believe our role is to offer our knowledge.  The more our customers know about art, techniques, styles and options, the more satisfying the relationship.

We always suggest that when buying art–especially if you are unsure, ask if you can take a piece home before you commit.  Take a day or two to live with your new piece and make sure it makes you feel good.  Sometimes you need to see it in your own space and test it in your own lighting. Natural light and artificial light will make your piece look different and checking the effects of day and night light are equally important.

Tip:  Be sure to write down measurements of your space or of pieces you want for the wall, shelves, tables, and niches.  Your favorite gallery will be better able to help you when you have specific sizes and details about your space.

At Hunter-Wolff Gallery, you can expect our staff to always be helpful.  If you need extra help, Hunter-Wolff Gallery can send an expert to your home to help with more complex projects.

Happy Art Hunting

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Keep Accurate Records of Your Art

June 22, 2015 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Hunter-Wolff Gallery | Comments (0)

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BaileyWallArt-lovers collect art because of choice.  Pieces collected can be priceless regardless of the monetary value. With every decision to select a piece from millions of options, collectors make the choice because it is special to them and represents that person.  That is why caring for your collection properly is so important. It extends beyond maintaining the physical condition.

It is important to keep records and a collection history. This will be invaluable for insurance purposes in case of theft or a catastrophic event. At Hunter-Wolff Gallery we recommend documenting your collection history with individual folders or a binder with tabs for each item in your collection but the best option is to keep your data on a flash drive or some other backup device with the following details:

  1. color photographs of your artwork, with a full-view and close up details—front, back, framed, unframed. Photograph multiple views of three-dimensional art.
  2. purchase date, price, and title of work (receipt) from vendor or gallery
  3. artist/maker information (biography)
  4. detailed description of object’s subject matter or type of work
  5. dimensions—framed and unframed for two-dimensional works. Overall and base measurements for three-dimensional works.
  6. media and support data detailed description of object—include location of scratches, losses, dents, abrasions, etc., that may not be visible in photographs.
  7. copies of all conservation and appraisal reports, text of inscriptions, markings, and labels
  8. provenance – ownership history
  9. bibliographic information if your work is cited in any exhibition catalogues, auction catalogues, exhibition history.

Most of the information you need should be available on your sales receipt or available through the vendor or gallery. Take a few minutes today to update your list.

 

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Change Your Status Quo With Art

May 19, 2015 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Children,Fine Art,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Janelle Cox,Oils,Old Colorado City,Paintings | Comments (0)

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Janelle Cox is Never Satisfied with The Status Quo and always brings new subject matter and fresh ideas to her canvas

 

How do you change status quo to get the most out of life? Do you look for new challenges? New adventures? Push the envelope a little?

In a recent conversation with a local Artist, he reminded me that he knows he isn’t improving or growing as an artist unless he brings new ideas to the forefront by challenging himself. He feels he isn’t doing his best work unless he sees improvement and the status quo never works for him. Ever.

In 1991, Ronald Regan said, “Status quo, you know, that is Latin for ‘the mess we’re in’.” If you don’t really like the “mess” you’re in, change it. Don’t settle for status quo.

I believe we all have the power to make change, to challenge ourselves, to improve our current state of affairs.  I like to believe that collecting art is part of that process.  It enriches our lives.  It makes us see the world with different eyes and feel a closer connection to world we live in.  Art transfers positive energy to our personal lives.

Case in point: After returning from being away for a period, I experienced with fresh eyes what visitors see when they walk through Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s door. It was reassuring to feel a much needed escape from the status quo and so much positive charge among our collections. I couldn’t have been more pleased to see new artwork that arrived while I as gone by Greg Custer, Janelle Cox, Fred Lunger and other dedicated artists.

It was a wonderful reminder that HWG continues to offer what is important and needed in our lives to stay uplifted and positive about the future. Stop in soon and see the new work now hanging by these fine artists–work that is always charged with energy, aesthetically appealing with a fresh contemporary flair and the perfect antidote for the status quo.

Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow ~ Albert Einstein

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Collecting Art: A Journey of Tiny Steps

May 7, 2015 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Oils,Personal Development | Comments (0)

GalleryJanelleMy adult children often quote their Dad who wisely pointed out, “Life is a journey, not a destination.”  — one of his favorite quotes from Ralph Waldo Emerson. He would urge our children and friends to enjoy life’s journey regardless of outcome even when they experienced a disappointment.

Collecting art is a journey too.  Sometimes we are afraid of what we don’t know and don’t trust our instincts.  As an art collector and gallery owner, I have often seen the look in someone’s eyes, even tears, when a special work of art triggers an emotion. But too often they walk away empty handed because of their lack of experience or understanding of a particular art form. They fail to experience the wonderful gift of art as part of their personal journey.

Like anything one does in life, it is important to be confident and trust ones instincts when considering  art.  A meaningful work of art in our life adds a new dimension to the person we can be.  It connects us to the world we live in similar to other art forms such as a beautiful song or memorable stage performance or award-winning literature. These experiences make us who we are, a more fulfilled and interesting being.
How often have you purchased tickets for a show and walked out disappointed?  Started a book everyone raved about, and put it down out of boredom? You might even purchase a piece of art that you are less than enchanted with later, but does that mean that you can’t enjoy art … or read another book or go to another performance?   Taking tiny steps, on your journey of life, allows you to grow and  smell the roses along the way. As you get more confident with your own tastes and spend a little time exploring what types of art speak to you, you will find the perfect gem to make your life sweeter.
Start today. Take a step toward the journey of collecting.  It is fascinating and exciting. In closing, I share another Emerson quote that happens to be one of my favorites:  “It is not the length of life, but the depth.” Ralph Waldo Emerson
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How To: Secure Gallery Representation

May 1, 2015 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Hunter-Wolff Gallery | Comments (0)

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handshake2The decision to approach a gallery for representation is followed by hard work and too often 7 common mistakes. Making these mistakes can create disappointment, waste time, impede financial opportunity and, more importantly, could permanently hurt the chance to secure the best representation for your work.

These few steps can increase chances for representation with a gallery. It may be surprising how many doors will open when following some simple guidelines.  Just like applying for any job in the marketplace, one needs to be prepared and follow common etiquette. Don’t fall short on these areas:

  1. Appointment – First, visit a gallery in person. Study as much as possible about the gallery from their website or speak with some of the resident artists. Set up an appointment with the owner or hiring manager for discussion purposes. Never show up without an appointment if you want to be taken seriously.
  2. Follow-Up – Timing is always a factor. Follow-up with a second call if you are not successful the first time. After a call or meeting with a gallery, regardless of the outcome, be courteous and follow-up with a thank you for their time, words of encouragement or anything else that you took away from your meeting. Don’t be shy about asking if you can follow-up with the gallery in 3-6 months if you think it is a good match but maybe the timing is not right. It may not turnout the way you want but following up later may be the perfect time to be invited back.
  3. Answers – Like any job interview, be prepared to answer questions about your track record and demonstrate you are a reliable artist who is prepared to deliver what the gallery needs when they need it. They will want to know about your experience, sales history and commitment. Be ready to discuss how you might contribute to their bottom-line.
  4. Portfolio – Leave your work at home or in your car until you are asked for it. Deliver a portfolio of images of your best work and formatted in a binder and on a CD. The CD will be appreciated by the busy gallery owner. Label each image with a title, size, and medium and format large enough (4×5) to be clearly viewed. Busy galleries don’t have time to look at your life’s work; 15 examples are sufficient to determine a good fit. Keep it concise, consistent, informative and relevant and make it easy for review.
  5. Consistency – Each portfolio should exhibit a meaningful body of work. Illustrate your uniqueness, technique, style, and appeal, but be consistent. If you are an oil painter and excel at landscapes, showing pencil sketches of nudes or abstract watercolors because you enjoy that too aren’t necessarily helpful. Show only your most recent body of work and your best work. Include sold work to show you have a track record. Artists who work in different mediums should develop a portfolio based on one medium only. Create multiple portfolios but format each as a series of work based on only one medium. Be consistent–don’t confuse the gallery with your different styles and different mediums.
  6. Inventory – An artist with half a dozen pieces of work isn’t likely to be accepted into an active gallery. A viable partnership starts with a volume of work that allows galleries to swap out or replace work on a moment’s notice. Many successful artists have as many as 75 or more pieces in their inventory and are constantly creating fresh work. The gallery can’t sell what you don’t have. If you only create a few pieces a month, you may not be ready for a gallery relationship.
  7. Self-Esteem –  Successful artists are confident in their artistic ability, marketability and the salability of their work. If you have a positive attitude, high self-esteem and confidence in your work, you will have a better chance to advance beyond your first meeting.

Lastly, for artists with a special talent, getting a foot in the gallery door should be the easiest step to an exciting career. There are many circumstances that may prevent an invitation initially; such as, timing, space availability, genre fit, etc. An unprepared artist, however, can turn a perfect opportunity into a disappointment. There is no short-cut to securing good representation. But, the artist who prepares has the best chance of enjoying a long and rewarding relationship with the best representatives for their work.

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Learn About Art At ArtWalk

April 2, 2015 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Best of the Springs,Clay and Fiber,Clifford T. Bailey,Colorado,Fine Art,Glow Pots,Justin Clements oils,Marlene Kort,Oils,Old Colorado City,Paintings,Pottery,Raku,Willow Bend Studios | Comments (0)

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ArtWalkImage2015Old Colorado City (Colorado Springs) offers a monthly art event, every first Friday of the month, that welcomes all ages and is family friendly.  If you are looking for a way to stretch your legs and learn something new about art, get your walking shoes on and expect to spend at least 2 hours admiring, learning, and considering new art. With 15 venues along Colorado Avenue, from 23rd to 27th Streets, you will find something to peak your interests. Hundreds of artists exhibit work and there is no shortage of styles and techniques.

At Hunter-Wolff Gallery, 2510 W. Colorado Avenue, ArtWalkers have the opportunity to meet many artists.  On April 3, David Newton, Justin Clements, Gina Grundemann, Gary Vigen, Marlene Kort, and many others will be available to answer questions.  Selling art is their livelihood and we can’t think of a better way to support artists than to come prepared to fall in love with original art and take it home to admire in your own home.

Hunter-Wolff Gallery will also have staff on hand to help guide you through the gallery if needed and point you in the direction for the next discovery along W. Colorado Avenue.

What do you think of these examples of art work being shown at Friday, April 3 ArtWalk?

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