Archive for the ‘art education’ Category

Tips for Hanging Wall Art

September 6, 2014 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Colorado,Fine Art,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City,Paintings | Comments (0)

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BaileyWall_tnDoes the simple task of hanging artwork seem like a daunting project and you wish someone would do it for you? You have your ladder and a dozen tools, measuring tape and marker but can’t seem to decide if it should go higher or lower? If you follow a few key steps, you will be admiring your new work from the sofa in no time. First, tell Hubby to leave the room unless he promises to be helpful.

Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s designer friends tell us they work to develop a relationship between the wall and the art. In other words, think about the way the art is hung in relationship to the architectural design of the wall and room. For DIYs, we suggest a simple method by determining the spacing for hanging a group of art.

Begin with measuring the available space on the wall. Account for any furniture against the wall and mark with painter’s tape between 5 ½ to 5¾ feet (universal eye-level height) from the floor.

Next, arrange an odd number of paintings together. For a mixed collection of art; i.e., a group of pastels, photos or children’s drawings, one might experiment by hanging them in a lyrical way, up and down like musical notes, keeping the mean level at 5 1/2 feet. To achieve balance with a group of pieces that are different in size and scale, some experts suggest visualizing an imaginary axis vertically and horizontally on the wall. Then place the pieces to achieve an equal weight and balance in each of the four quadrants.

Finish by lining up the centers of all the pictures for display and create an arrangement on the floor or flat surface, starting from the center of the grouping and working outward.

For a single piece of art, think of the wall in terms of quarters, thirds, halves, etc., in determining the placement of the piece on the wall. Accurately measure the proportions , both horizontally and vertically. In a room with a 9-foot ceiling, for example, we advise that the chair rail should be at 3 feet (one-third), leaving 6 feet above for the painting. With the center of the work at the 6-foot mark, it would be proportionately in the center of the top of the space. When in doubt, ask Hunter-Wolff Gallery for advice or if you are located in the Colorado Springs area, ask if we can come to your home to hang your artwork for a small fee!

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Your Pathway to Learning

August 29, 2014 in American Made,Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Justin Clements oils,Oils,Old Colorado City,Paintings,Personal Development | Comments (0)

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OnionsAGlass Bottle12x161Artists are inspired by all sorts of things that can lead them down a new path causing a change or improvement in their style. One of Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s up and coming artists Justin Clements, recently delivered a  dozen or so new paintings that grabbed my attention.  I noticed he was doing something new with bits of color that looked like confetti over his painting.  This new addition to his work has an interesting effect and I  specifically asked  about the little pieces of color. At first, he smiled and was pleased I noticed but  didn’t have a ready answer.

After leaving to return to his studio, he  started  thinking about my probing question and realized something that had not occurred to him before. The last six months or so Justin had been studying the French impressionist movement and, specifically, the timeless works of Claude Monet. Monet’s work truly moved him and had a profound affect on Justin. Although several days had gone by, Justin contacted me to let me know he believed studying Monet’s style  influenced him to look at problems of light and color in a new way. Justin thanked me for noticing the tiny change that made such a big difference in his work and mentioning the detail that lead to this fun realization.

You never know where, when or how your questions might trigger deeper thought.  This is what art does.  Original art makes us think and stimulate conversation.  Take time today to look deeply at a piece of original art and see if you can come up with several questions for the artist or owner of the art.  You never know what path your question will take you. Learning about art is fun. See more new original paintings today at Hunter-Wolff Gallery.

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Buying Art? Use Good Judgement

in American Made,Art,art education,Art Gallery,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City,Paintings | Comments (0)

moneyBuying art, like buying any major purchase, is not without its risks. How do you know the price paid is actually a true reflection of its worth? The better way to assess value is to consider how the art you are considering makes you feel on a deeper emotional or intellectual level. When a piece jogs a memory or evokes something pleasant, it becomes meaningful and the value can be measured by how it makes you feel. Aside from affordability, your choice should consider whether it will be a pleasure for you day in and day out.  If these considerations are made, you are likely to make the right choice regardless of the artist’s fame or price tag.

If purchasing outside a reputable gallery, there is a possibility that the artwork is not authentic or it could even be a stolen piece. Purchasing a stolen piece could turn a joyous occasion into the loss of a lot of money and the piece being reclaimed by authorities. There is an Art Loss Register service based in Amsterdam, Cologne, New York and Paris, where pieces can be checked. More than 200,000 works of stolen art reside in the ALR database.  This registry not only stores famous pieces but includes works of less celebrity. Of course, searching the database cannot guarantee that a piece is not stolen. Working through a reputable gallery or art broker could save a lot of headaches.  Reputable galleries, auction houses and brokers know the history of pieces before offering them for sale.  Always be sure to check with your local galleries and take some time to build a relationship with its owner and staff.  Like any other service provider for your home, it is beneficial to know who you are doing business with and to work with local small businesses. More information about buying art and regional artists can be learned from Hunter-Wolff Gallery at www.hunterwolffgallery.com or by calling 719-520-9494

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Gallery Representation: A Strong Relationship

April 8, 2014 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Development,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Personal Development | Comments (0)

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WherepiritDaVinciAs an art gallery entrepreneur, artists frequently ask what I expect from an artist. Getting your foot in the door is one thing, but after representation is offered, the difficulty many artists have is staying on course with the gallery.  Too few artists understand that their long-term success in a gallery depends on one thing – “building a strong relationship”.

When two people come together, one business and one creative, the expectations need to be clear from the start for the relationship to thrive. Much like marriage where opposites attract, the relationship becomes an opportunity to learn from one another and appreciate each other’s strengths.  

Entrepreneurs assess opportunities and weigh the risks. They are planners and have financial goals. A new artist is a risk but their potential is important to the gallery’s goals.  Depending on the artist’s potential, the gallery determines how much time, money and display space to invest.  The artist gains an advantage when he/she comes to the table not only with potential but with commitment, personal goals, and core values that align with the gallery.

There isn’t anything more disappointing than having invested in an artist who decides to leave shortly after arrival because they decide to promote their work in a different way or do something else with their lives. Research also shows that the absentee artist and one-hit wonders are disappointments that make galleries cringe.  Galleries are also super cautious about artists who are capable, but show signs of limitations, are unreliable, change style frequently, or simply behave unprofessionally.

From a business perspective, I appreciate artists who have some knowledge of business and recognize what a successful business partnership involves. Those lacking business experience need to show a willingness to learn and accept the terms of their new relationship. Everyone values artists who understand their role in the partnership, even in times of hardship or adversity. The relationship can only blossom when players are cooperative.

After an artist lands a position in a gallery, he/she cannot assume everything is peachy because time has passed without major issues.  An artist needs to be attentive because the gallery is ALWAYS looking at the future if they want to be in the future.  Being a silent partner does not make a good partner.  Relationships will continue to advance when responsibility is shared. Communicate with your gallery and take time to ask how to make improvements. There are artists out there as qualified as you and ready to take your spot, and galleries are ALWAYS looking for opportunities to improve their future. 

Successful partners share prosperity and enjoy a rewarding, long-term relationship.  It’s not just about getting along, but showing mutual respect for what each brings to the table. Frequently gallery owners describe their ideal business relationships with artists like friendships. Personalities have to match. “It’s easy to love great art work but when personalities clash, a business relationship will never work.” It doesn’t have to be a love-fest but partners do have to get along and have respect for one another.

Here’s a few tips to keep your gallery happy and forge a relationship that will stand the test of time:

  • Become familiar with the gallery’s history, plans, and philosophy.
  • Get acquainted with all staff members and help educate your representatives about your technique and background.  Stories sell art!
  • Make promotion of your work easy for the gallery.  Provide quality images and full descriptions, videos, schedule live demonstrations, and keep up with the gallery’s social networks.
  • Stay engaged!  It only takes minutes to call or send a text message and keep communications open.
  • Be flexible about pricing and willing to work with the gallery to make sales. Do not let someone else’s advice convince you to increase your prices.  Trust your gallery; they have knowledge that can guide your strategic plans. An inappropriate price increase can push your prices too high resulting in lost sales. Be aware that it is far better to sell everything at reasonable prices than nothing at unreasonable prices.
  • Ask your gallery what they need for their clientele.  Never deliver new work without approval or push work that is not wanted.
  • Keep requests to a minimum and never make demands. Remember, you are not the business owner and the owner is responsible for the bottom-line.
  • Keep in contact without overdoing it.  Ask the gallery how often makes sense to “check-in” if you are unsure.  Some might want to communicate every week while other gallery owners are comfortable with once a month.

Stay positive and remember to recognize all the work your gallery does on your behalf. Send us tips that work for you too and they will  be shared in a follow-up post.

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Gallery Representation: Invited! Now What?

April 6, 2014 in Art,art education,Artists,Development,Hunter-Wolff Gallery | Comments (0)

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DonnaSharonHiFi2-1Congratulations, you have been invited to join other professional artists in an art gallery of your choosing! Now what? 

Now the hard work begins for you and the art gallery.  Working together your goal is to sell as much art as possible and to keep your new gallery family happy. After you signed your contract, delivered your body of work, and hi-fived, you probably thought, “I’ve done it!  I can go home and create artwork.”  Not so fast!  There’s a lot of work ahead; your job isn’t that simple.  Delivering work and waiting to collect your commissions is hardly a big step.  In fact, the big step is yet to come.

Building a strong business relationship is your most critical step and requires constant attention, commitment and desire. Rather than tell  artists how to build a relationship, I will share what Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s most successful artists do to keep the business relationship growing, the commission checks flowing and ensure long-term success.  It’s one of the most important lessons to being a successful artist. Your relationship with your gallery is a collaborative effort. The gallery  is your advocate so it is beneficial to build a strong relationship.  The top selling, highest in demand artists are the hardest working artists I know.  These artists are not only passionate and driven, they work long hours perfecting quality art  and never settling for mediocrity. They are planners, people with goals, have integrity, good communication (listening) skills, business acumen (open-minds),  good organizational skills, team players, and confidence. Aside from excellent creative skills, the one skill that stands out from the rest is business acumen.  They keep lines of communication open by taking the initiative to share information with their representatives — about what is planned and other relevant information.  They take the time to educate about their techniques and processes so information and value can be accurately shared with patrons.  They visit their representatives regularly to ensure gallery expectations are being met and needs are fulfilled.  They are honest with themselves, set egos aside, and change with economic and  market conditions. They ask how they can help.

A successful artist is accountable and takes action to correct issues when  warranted. They  manage their time,  creative energy and resources. They balance the time to produce art and to market it. They gather feedback to make better business decisions. Whether they enjoy the business aspects of the art world or not, they do those tasks responsibly to be a better team player. Successful artists are serious about business and understand how partnerships work and what benefits of collaboration are.  These are not artists who make demands but artists who delight in their shared success with business partners. They have learned the most important lesson:  with success comes responsibility!

To make a gallery-artist relationship strong and long lasting, is to understand the gallery’s role and accept the terms and conditions of your relationship. Hunter-Wolff Gallery offers consultative assistance. Take the next step to be a successful artist; call for availability 719-520-9494

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Art Class 101: Drawing

March 20, 2014 in Art,art education,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Teaching | Comments (0)

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IMG_1303Whether you are a beginner or an advanced artist, pay-as-you-go life drawing sessions allow you to develop or refine your  drawing skills. With a per-session limit of 5 attendees, these hands-on life drawing sessions allow you to draw faces and figures at your own pace and receive individual critique from the moderator. Hunter-Wolff Gallery provides the model and the moderator. You provide your own drawing supplies.

Every Wednesday classes are available in a relaxed setting to improve current skills or learn new skills. All you need is a sketch pad, a few soft pencils 2B, 4B, and 6B, an eraser and desire to build good foundation skills. Call 719-520-9494 to reserve your space.  Need evening classes, just ask!

Register by calling 719-520-9494 or emailing hunterwolffgallery@gmail.com and reserve your space at 2510 W. Colorado Avenue, Colorado Springs

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Lead the Way to LayAway

March 17, 2014 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Clifford T. Bailey,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Oils,Old Colorado City,Paintings,Pottery,Shop Small,Small Business | Comments (0)

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Piggy-Bank1How many times have you returned to purchase a special piece of art days after you first saw it and it was gone? Not only are you disappointed, but the staff at Hunter-Wolff Gallery too is disappointed that you missed out. When you don’t want to use a credit card and you don’t have the cash on hand for your art purchase, consider using Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s layaway plan. It’s a great option and it doesn’t cost anything extra.

When you buy an item on credit, you take the merchandise home with you but then you are likely to pay a premium to your credit card holder while you make installment payments. When you use our  layaway, however, you agree to a non-refundable deposit equal to a percentage of the purchase price and pay over time at no extra charge. How great is that?

Because we want you to own the art you love, we never add a handling fee or any up-charge to your layaway. We do remove the item from the sales floor and it remains in storage reserved for you until the final payment is made.

We get it that being in debt  is a dumb idea.  That is why we started offering layaway almost nine years ago and many collectors can attest to collecting using our layaway plan without upsetting their household budget. We are big fans of the Dave Ramsey philosophy “Cash is King; Debt is Dumb!” and understand why you may not want to charge a purchase.

By the way, there isn’t a small business that I know who doesn’t prefer cash.  Cash sales save small businesses money and helps keep operating costs low.   So when you get the chance, use cash and help your local small businesses thrive and grow without adding increases to your purchases. Did you really think all those credit card rewards came free?

Remember: the Hunter-Wolff Gallery  layaway purchase plan is not limited to in-store purchases. We also offer layaway options for items that clients find on our website or Facebook. Our goal is to help you acquire the artwork that you love without causing financial stress.  Layaway is easy; start with a down payment and make regular weekly or monthly payments and before you know it, you will own beautiful original artwork.  Now lets start talking about the art you love!

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BurrrrrrrL

December 4, 2013 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City | Comments (0)

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IMG_0181No, Burl doesn’t have anything to do with being cold. It is all about beautiful wood. Some new burl aspen vessels by Jerry Wedekind are arriving in time for holiday shopping. We get so many questions about the type of wood and what exactly burl means it was time to give you a little explanation. A burl is a tree growth or by-product of environmental- or human-caused stress in which the grain has grown in a deformed manner.

Some are in the form of a rounded outgrowth on a tree trunk or branch filled with small knots from dormant buds. Burls can also grow beneath the ground attached to the roots and discovered when the tree dies or falls over. In some tree species, burls can grow to enormous size adding to the challenge and expense of removing the burl from its natural habitat to the woodworker’s studio.

For artists like Jerry Wedekind, Elmer Jacobs and Vinny Luciani at Hunter-Wolff Gallery, burls yield a very peculiar and figured wood that are highly prized for interesting patterns and rich color. The low occurrence rate of burls adds to their value and collectability.

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Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s three wood-turners covet burls for their beauty, but the art of creating with them requires patience and special skills. Burl wood is very hard to work in a lathe or with hand tools because its grain is not straight but misshapen. The highly desirable irregular patterns of burl wood make it harder to saw, chisel, and cut without splitting the wood or accidentally cutting it in the wrong direction.

Stop in soon and let us tell you more about this incredibly beautiful wood!

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Caring for Customers

November 3, 2013 in American Made,Art,art education,Art Gallery,Best of the Springs,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Shop Small | Comments (0)

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HunterWolffGalleryfrontColor trends and fashions change year to year. One thing that never goes out of style is great customer care.  What some sellers forget, however, is that “customer care” MEANS caring. Caring is defined as “displaying kindness and concern for others” and that applies to the workplace.  Having served thousands of customers for most of my career, I am fairly certain that most will admit that when it comes to buying, price and perceived value come much lower on the list than one might expect.

At Hunter-Wolff Gallery, we know from experience that customers prefer to buy from sellers who deliver exceptional service and show they care by:

  • Connecting on a personal level while getting down to business
  • Being responsive to concerns and objectives
  • Sharing product knowledge with confidence
  • Listening (not talking!) to the customer and providing full attention to the customer
  • Taking time to fully understand every possible detail about the customer’s requirements and needs
  • Helping the customer avoid potential risks or drawbacks
  • Bringing  solutions, options and new ideas to the table
  • Developing a workable solution
  • Communicating the purchasing process in simple terms
  • Providing value above other options

When a seller cannot demonstrate that buying from them is the right course of action for the customer, the customer should buy elsewhere. All things being equal, most people would rather buy from somebody they like and that is true when all things are not equal too.  When someone walks out Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s door with or without a purchase, we want them to remember that we did everything possible to make their experience positive. Sounds simple doesn’t it?

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Blazing My Own Trail

September 20, 2013 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Fine Art,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City,Personal Development | Comments (0)

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Welcome to Hunter-Wolff Gallery

It is nearly 8 years since we opened our door on W. Colorado Avenue in Colorado Springs.  I have to admit, I wasn’t sure it was something I would be good at or even enjoy.  Owning a gallery in charming Old Colorado City was one of the best decisions I ever made regarding career choices.  It’s hard to imagine that I spent almost three decades in the high-tech telecom field, traveling around the world, and giving up the things I really loved to do.  Not anymore.

Today, I pour my heart and soul into what I do and love every minute of it.  Yes, there are days when I shake my head and question why I work so many long hours, but it is just something that is in my blood. We’ve all heard it before, “Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.”

Isn’t that the way it should be?  Finding your right place in the world is so important and doing what brings pleasure and satisfaction keeps the world turning.  I can’t image doing anything else and I plan to be on this “trail” for as long as possible.  I hope you come and visit Hunter-Wolff Gallery and meet some of the amazing people who make my day almost perfect.

I wish you too a happy career — where you too never have to work a day in your life.  It’s out there, you just have to look and take a chance.

 

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