Archive for the ‘Teaching’ Category

Lessons Learned+

January 18, 2015 in American Made,Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Award,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Oils,Old Colorado City,Paintings,Teaching | Comments (0)

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Roses in TerraCotta 10x8 by Justin Clements

Roses in Terracotta 10×8 by Justin Clements

 

A wise man told me nearly 40 years ago, “Always buy quality. Quality products last long after the price is forgotten.”  It doesn’t matter what you purchase, there is no substitute for top-grade quality and that goes for artwork too. Quality artwork is made with quality materials and showcased in quality frames and platforms.

Furthermore, what you do with your fine art makes a difference too.  Making your home inviting and comfortable by adding beautiful, original art isn’t the whole story. Displaying art correctly is as important as selecting the right art. It’s often a daunting job finding the right art and resources you can trust.  That’s why Hunter-Wolff Gallery offers helpful services to help complete the job of displaying your art for the most impact. When working on a bigger project that involves assembling an entire room, bring your color swatches, wall and key furniture measurements and your personal style.

To make your home inviting and beautiful means hand-picking and displaying timeless (quality) pieces correctly so they can be fully appreciated.  For example, hanging paintings too high or too low disrupts the room balance.  Worse is hanging “bargain” filler pictures/prints because you “need something decorative to fill up space”.

Lack of originality and quality sends a reminder every day.  You will enjoy your home more and your art when it reflects your style and echoes a sense of originality and harmony. Ask for guidance and acquire quality original art over time. Sharon at Hunter-Wolff Gallery will help you present your quality art properly and ensure artwork is hung correctly. Just ask!

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No-No Signs Not Here

April 21, 2014 in American Made,Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Teaching | Comments (0)

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Do NotDon’t you hate those signs in some stores that seem obvious? Do Not Touch;  You Break It, You Buy It; Checks with Proper ID Only; No Food, No Cameras; No Smoking; No Pets; No Cell Phones; No, No, No As a responsible adult, would you ever bring food into an art gallery or engage in a private conversation on your phone without considering those around you? Yes, some people do these things but it is a rare occurrence. Personally, I don’t need a sign to tell me how to behave and I believe my customers feel that way too. I understand why some retailers feel the need to display this type of signage but it just makes me want to leave their store.  How does it make you feel? 

As a business owner, my philosophy is to give people the benefit of the doubt and the opportunity to demonstrate that they are responsible adults accountable for their own actions. If someone decides to walk into my gallery with their four year old eating a drippy ice cream cone, then it is easy enough to politely ask the parent to come back when their youngster is done with his/her treat.  I prefer to address that small percentage of the population who display bad manners in a way that helps that person understand why they’re behavior is unacceptable. 

We enjoy visitors who bring their pets and children (without ice cream) and touch the touchables. Touching is a great way to learn and almost everything is waiting for you to explore it. Of course, we prefer visitors to  study the paintings with their eyes only. If visiting an art gallery is a new experience for your family and you are unsure what is acceptable, just ask if you can pick up something to admire it or ask if it is okay to bring your refreshment into the store with you.  We don’t operate like a museum or a library where there are strict rules. Visitors do not need to feel compelled to whisper either.  Hunter-Wolff Gallery and its staff are here to share information about everything we offer and want you to experience art first hand.  Often it takes both hands to experience what a burl feels like, for example.

Bring the dog, the kids and if possible, leave your cell in your pocket and let us help you learn about something new that could possibly change your life and give you new appreciation for art made by American artists–without a bunch of signs making you feel uptight.

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Gallery Representation: Getting Your Foot In The Door

April 2, 2014 in Art Gallery,Artists,Development,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Personal Development,Teaching | Comments (0)

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HWGshowroomHow does an artist find the best gallery representation? … Not perfect but best?  Like any relationship, it will be more satisfying if you search for the best scenario and not expect perfection. As a gallery owner, I advise artists to think about finding a gallery like looking for a job.  It is more productive to identify a few potential galleries and determine if you are a good match, then working hard to make it happen. If you have a good body of work and are ready, take the next step to make contact.

Keep in mind before taking that step, however, that there will be a time when things don’t go exactly as planned. Like any career, if you work long enough you will experience some downs with the ups—and may have to endure a difficult boss (or gallery) for a brief period. But I believe that the majority of time, business dealings are positive and that goes for gallery relationships too. It is counterproductive to let a few bad experiences color your beliefs and attitudes about gallery relationships—especially those rumored.  Remember, dealing with an art gallery is a business relationship and it takes two to tango! As in all cases, there are always two sides to a story so don’t put much stock into the tales (gossip) from a third party.  Some people are very good at pointing fingers and blaming others when things don’t work out.

You will benefit by taking time to scope out a gallery quietly.  Visit their website, read their newsletters, attend their events, talk to their artists and visit to observe how the staff conducts business.  You will learn a ton of information just by observing.  You want the gallery to work for you and the gallery wants you to work for them. Would you work for a company that was short on integrity or had a poor reputation?  Of course not. Nor would a gallery want “to hire” someone without integrity or commitment. Make sure your prospects are a good fit and your art could benefit or contribute to the gallery. Don’t overlook the fact that a gallery has its own personality and it should fit with yours. Then call or write for a personal interview with the decision maker (gallery owner). If you can’t find information on the gallery’s website about how their submission process works, be sure to ask.  Never show up without an appointment.  Be respectful of the gallery’s business hours and the staff’s time.

To prepare for your interview, be sure to complete your due diligence ahead of time and stick to the schedule the gallery sets up for your meeting. Be professional, dress appropriately and take examples of your best work or portfolio.  The gallery will have a list of questions for you, so you too should be prepared with answers about your track record and your own questions about their processes and programs.

If and when you are invited to join a gallery, work hard to meet the gallery’s expectation and don’t forget to ask them “what can I do?” to help with sales and promotion.  Like any relationship, it takes two working together to achieve a long and rewarding experience.

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Art Class 101: Drawing

March 20, 2014 in Art,art education,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Teaching | Comments (0)

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IMG_1303Whether you are a beginner or an advanced artist, pay-as-you-go life drawing sessions allow you to develop or refine your  drawing skills. With a per-session limit of 5 attendees, these hands-on life drawing sessions allow you to draw faces and figures at your own pace and receive individual critique from the moderator. Hunter-Wolff Gallery provides the model and the moderator. You provide your own drawing supplies.

Every Wednesday classes are available in a relaxed setting to improve current skills or learn new skills. All you need is a sketch pad, a few soft pencils 2B, 4B, and 6B, an eraser and desire to build good foundation skills. Call 719-520-9494 to reserve your space.  Need evening classes, just ask!

Register by calling 719-520-9494 or emailing hunterwolffgallery@gmail.com and reserve your space at 2510 W. Colorado Avenue, Colorado Springs

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Once A Month A Must: ArtWalk

September 3, 2013 in American Made,Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Award,Colorado,Custom Art,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Oils,Paintings,Shop Small,Small Business,Teaching | Comments (0)

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Do you love being on top of what is happening in the art community? Then you should have ArtWalk on your calendar! It’s the first Friday of every month through December in Old Colorado City, right on Colorado Avenue. Check the galleries along the Avenue between 24th and 27th Streets to enjoy the latest collections and hear the latest news. Be sure to stop in at Hunter-Wolff Gallery!

Having received “Best” awards eight years running, you don’t want to miss what everyone is talking about. Whether you are a casual or hard-core collector, ArtWalk is great way to meet some of the gallery artists, gallery owners and staff, and learn about new trends, along with a wide variety of mediums, and techniques.

There are hundreds of individual art pieces to be found in Old Colorado City’s art galleries–the largest concentration of artists and galleries in Colorado Springs within three city blocks. And after all the art browsing and buying, there isn’t a better place in Colorado Springs to meet up with friends over a great meal or refreshments.

Be sure to add ArtWalk to your calendar now 5-8 pm in Old Colorado City.   Parking is free, admission is free and the fun is priceless!

Hunter-Wolff Gallery is also hosting a 3 hour live oil painting demo on September 6, from 5-8 pm.  Learn what is on the mind of regional artist Patience Heyl as she works her canvas and paints for a few magical hours.

 

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A New Journey

April 14, 2013 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Development,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Paintings,Personal Development,Teaching | Comments (0)

Prairie Storm, 9 x 12, by Pamela Poll

My late husband always said, “Life is a journey, not a destination.”  — one of his favorite quotes from Ralph Waldo Emerson. Emerson was a wise man and so was my husband.  He would urge our children and friends to enjoy life’s journey regardless of outcome when they experienced a disappointment or failure with this quote.  Collecting art is a journey too.  Sometimes we are afraid of what we don’t know and don’t trust our instincts.  As a gallery owner, I have often seen the look in someone’s eyes, even tears, when a special painting triggers an emotion, but because of their lack of experience or understanding of a particular art form they walk away empty handed. They fail to experience the wonderful gift of art as part of their journey.

Like anything we do in life, it is important to trust our instincts when thinking about art.  Including meaningful works of art in our life changes who we are.  It adds a new dimension to the person we can be.  It connects us to the world we live in similiar to other art forms such as a beautiful song, or memorable stage performance or award-winning literature. These experiences make us who we are, a more fullfilled being.
How often have you purchased tickets for a show and walked out disappointed?  Started a book everyone raved about, and put it down out of boredom? You might even purchase a piece of art that you are less than enchanted with months down the road, but it doesn’t mean that you can’t enjoy art … or reading another book or going to another performance?  We all make mistakes. Taking tiny steps, on your journey of life, allows you to grow and … smell the roses along the way. As you get more familiar with your own interests, tastes, and spend a little time exploring what types of art speak to you, you will find the perfect gem to make your life sweeter.  Take a step toward the journey of collecting.  It is fastinating and exciting.
In closing, I share another Emerson quote that happens to be one of my favorites:  “It is not the length of life, but the depth.” Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Call for Student Artists: Cash Awards to Top Winners

February 24, 2013 in Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Award,Colorado,Development,Events,Honors,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Oils,Paintings,Teaching | Comments (0)

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How often is a gifted art student given the opportunity to compete for cash awards outside of school and show-off their talent in an art gallery? Hunter-Wolff Gallery is offering that opportunity this June. A juried art competition limited to student artists between the ages of 14 and 22 are invited to apply for this opportunity. There is no limitation on where a student lives.  There is a limit to the number of students, however, who will be selected. Eligible students must apply by registering before April 30. Do it today and start planning now!

The intent of this program is to provide art students with real-world experience, competing in a fine art gallery venue. With the help of a professional artist mentor, students will benefit by learning the do’s and don’ts of submitting art work in a juried competition.  All applicants must submit a non-refundable application fee of $5 with a complete Registration form to Hunter-Wolff Gallery, 2510 W. Colorado Avenue, Colorado Springs, CO 80904.

Cash awards for winners of Setting the Stage are generously provided by sponsors such as Colorado Springs Style Magazine, Rick Lien at Bankers Life and Casualty Company, Todd Crystal at Crystal Capital Advisors, Tony & Marcelline Cerato, Glaser Frames of Denver,  and other anonymous supporters. More than $2,000 will be awarded at the Awards Ceremony to top winners on Friday, June 7 and the exhibit closes on June 15.

Tell your gifted friends who love the thrill of a competition and chance to win serious cash awards! Registration and requirements can be found on the Hunter-Wolff Gallery website. Contact Hunter-Wolff Gallery at 719-520-9494 or hunterwolffgallery@gmail.com with questions if something isn’t clear.  We look forward to helping set the stage for gifted young students who are interested in a future in the art world.

Good luck to each creative applicant!  We are as excited as you will be on June 7!

 

 

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You Want to be a What?

January 10, 2013 in Art,Art Gallery,Colorado,Development,Events,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City,Paintings,Personal Development,Small Business,Teaching | Comments (0)

When you own a business, you are likely approached by job-seekers at some point in the day or week or month.  If you are lucky, the job opportunities you offer are well defined and responsibilities are clear.  Then there are the jobs like “curator” that isn’t always well-defined and the job seeker can’t clearly define what they are experienced at or the value of their skills.

People want to work.  People needs jobs and people need purpose.  When I ask ‘Job-Seeking Joe’ to describe to me what he thinks a curator does, the reply is often met with a blank stare or the comment, “I can hang pictures.”  Well, I am here to tell you a curator does more than that and the following is just the beginning.

What is a gallery curator and his responsibility? The curator is the overseer of the gallery art collection and the key responsibilities at the top of the list are generally managing the acquisition of art, handling delivery/returns, developing short- and long-term exhibit plans, and displaying a collection in order to inform, educate and inspire the public as well as provide proper exposure for the artist. The specific needs of a curator can vary from gallery to gallery, resulting in an opportunity for the job seeker to develop his/her own responsibilities.

In smaller galleries, the curator may also handle public relations, marketing, fundraising, and events. Curators prepare and manage budgets, train and manage staff, and build relationships with both internal and external partners, clients, and stakeholders.

Sounds like the curator is a business owner? Sometimes the entrepreneurial owner is the curator. It is not unusual to find galleries managed single-handedly or with few staff or sales personnel.  It’s a challenge that takes many talents, business skills and a level of expertise, and experience grows with time.  I’ve been curating for seven years and few would want my job . . . and I wouldn’t trade it for anything.

 

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