Archive for the ‘Hunter-Wolff Gallery’ Category

Party With A Flare

October 19, 2014 in Art,Art Gallery,Colorado,Events,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City | Comments (0)

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WineRoses2_tn IMG_0661_tnTable_tnLooking for a party space that is beautiful and not going to cost you an arm and a leg? Your business or corporation can reserve Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s space for an intimate evening in a beautiful setting.  If you have a group of friends or want to do something extraordinary for that special someone, Hunter-Wolff Gallery has the perfect setting for an evening.  We can make recommendations for local caterers and entertainment. Surrounded by fine artwork, you will get your message across that says, “I appreciate you (or your business) and look forward to a long and rewarding relationship.” Hunter-Wolff Gallery can get as creative as you like to help make your evening memorable and meaningful. We have lots of suggestions for dining, wine, flowers, and entertainers like Randy Rodriquez. We can even have an artist on site to do a live demonstration or create a portrait of your honoree.  Call 719-520-9494 and let us help you started planning a special evening.

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Affordable. Durable. Practical.

October 4, 2014 in American Made,Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Pottery | Comments (0)

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TH1259traycup_tn TH-Red_tn TH1395_tn TH_oil cruets_tnComfort food–the ultimate hug for the soul this time of year! Even though Hunter-Wolff Gallery doesn’t sell comfort food, you can find Colorado-made pottery for serving your favorite meals for that ultimate hug. Tony Heslop, a fine potter in Colorado Springs, creates an array of colorful, practical tableware for everyday living. Everyday doesn’t mean not special!

Tony’s “pots” are a feast for the eyes and when you add your own home-cooked recipes, it is a combo your family and guests will come back for more. There is nothing like filling the kitchen with the smell of home baked bread and pastries and a bubbling treat on the stove or crock-pot and serving it up on beautiful clayware.

Fans have been collecting Tony’s work for nearly 40 years and several generations of cooks keep adding pieces to their own collections and for gifts. Each year he adds new designs, colors and shapes and his work continues to evolve to keep the kitchen kings and queens happy. His glazes are food safe and kitchen-friendly because they work in the microwave, dishwasher and oven. If you like adding a bottle wine to the table, check out his wine chiller. Place it in the freezer for a few hours and then on the table and your white wine and champagne will stay chilled throughout the meal, and they are so affordable, you might add several to the table.

When you are looking for a wedding, anniversary, or shower gifts, and have a modest budget, consider finding something special from the Tony Heslop pottery collection. We know the gift will be welcomed and cherished for years to come.

Buy local. Buy American. Buy treasures for a lifetime.

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Tips for Hanging Wall Art

September 6, 2014 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Colorado,Fine Art,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City,Paintings | Comments (0)

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BaileyWall_tnDoes the simple task of hanging artwork seem like a daunting project and you wish someone would do it for you? You have your ladder and a dozen tools, measuring tape and marker but can’t seem to decide if it should go higher or lower? If you follow a few key steps, you will be admiring your new work from the sofa in no time. First, tell Hubby to leave the room unless he promises to be helpful.

Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s designer friends tell us they work to develop a relationship between the wall and the art. In other words, think about the way the art is hung in relationship to the architectural design of the wall and room. For DIYs, we suggest a simple method by determining the spacing for hanging a group of art.

Begin with measuring the available space on the wall. Account for any furniture against the wall and mark with painter’s tape between 5 ½ to 5¾ feet (universal eye-level height) from the floor.

Next, arrange an odd number of paintings together. For a mixed collection of art; i.e., a group of pastels, photos or children’s drawings, one might experiment by hanging them in a lyrical way, up and down like musical notes, keeping the mean level at 5 1/2 feet. To achieve balance with a group of pieces that are different in size and scale, some experts suggest visualizing an imaginary axis vertically and horizontally on the wall. Then place the pieces to achieve an equal weight and balance in each of the four quadrants.

Finish by lining up the centers of all the pictures for display and create an arrangement on the floor or flat surface, starting from the center of the grouping and working outward.

For a single piece of art, think of the wall in terms of quarters, thirds, halves, etc., in determining the placement of the piece on the wall. Accurately measure the proportions , both horizontally and vertically. In a room with a 9-foot ceiling, for example, we advise that the chair rail should be at 3 feet (one-third), leaving 6 feet above for the painting. With the center of the work at the 6-foot mark, it would be proportionately in the center of the top of the space. When in doubt, ask Hunter-Wolff Gallery for advice or if you are located in the Colorado Springs area, ask if we can come to your home to hang your artwork for a small fee!

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Buying Art? Use Good Judgement

August 29, 2014 in American Made,Art,art education,Art Gallery,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City,Paintings | Comments (0)

moneyBuying art, like buying any major purchase, is not without its risks. How do you know the price paid is actually a true reflection of its worth? The better way to assess value is to consider how the art you are considering makes you feel on a deeper emotional or intellectual level. When a piece jogs a memory or evokes something pleasant, it becomes meaningful and the value can be measured by how it makes you feel. Aside from affordability, your choice should consider whether it will be a pleasure for you day in and day out.  If these considerations are made, you are likely to make the right choice regardless of the artist’s fame or price tag.

If purchasing outside a reputable gallery, there is a possibility that the artwork is not authentic or it could even be a stolen piece. Purchasing a stolen piece could turn a joyous occasion into the loss of a lot of money and the piece being reclaimed by authorities. There is an Art Loss Register service based in Amsterdam, Cologne, New York and Paris, where pieces can be checked. More than 200,000 works of stolen art reside in the ALR database.  This registry not only stores famous pieces but includes works of less celebrity. Of course, searching the database cannot guarantee that a piece is not stolen. Working through a reputable gallery or art broker could save a lot of headaches.  Reputable galleries, auction houses and brokers know the history of pieces before offering them for sale.  Always be sure to check with your local galleries and take some time to build a relationship with its owner and staff.  Like any other service provider for your home, it is beneficial to know who you are doing business with and to work with local small businesses. More information about buying art and regional artists can be learned from Hunter-Wolff Gallery at www.hunterwolffgallery.com or by calling 719-520-9494

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How Did They Do That?

August 4, 2014 in Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Pottery,Raku,textured | Comments (0)

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWith more than 30 years experience in visual media, Marc Jenesel is a graphic artist and animator but dedicates every available moment for his passion creating Raku. His signature pots, ‘Glow Pots’, truly glow from the interior and the first response seeing them in person is, “Is there a candle in there?”.

No candles, trick lighting or any other  light sources are added to make Marc’s Glow Pots glow.   They are beautifully created by an accomplished potter, Marc Jenesel, then fired at 1800 degrees, removed from the kiln at their maximum temperature, cooled and embellished with layers of copper leaf which catch the ambient light fork a beautiful soft glow.  Before bringing his finished products to Hunter-Wolff Gallery, there are a number of steps in between, quality control checks are made and only perfect pots are delivered. The waiting is well worth it.

Through his science background and experience, he is able to obtain the range of textures and glaze colors using chemistry and post-firing reduction. He explains, “Much of my education is in the sciences. I believe art and science run parallel. As science has become more abstract and out there, so has art. I think a well-rounded education in the arts requires some study of the sciences.” His results are remarkable and formulated for rich color and texture before they are made available to collectors. Stop in and visit Hunter-Wolff Gallery in Old Colorado City, Colorado Springs, and discover how Marc creates Raku pottery like no other potter.

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Beauty from Devastation

August 2, 2014 in Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,trees | Comments (0)

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BLKFtreeThe last two years have been trying for many Coloradans in the Colorado Springs area because of terrible wildfires.  At the time, it was hard not to think constantly about all the devastation and wonder how people directly affected would get through it.  The summer of 2014 is quite different for most residents in this area because of better weather conditions and lots of rain—almost daily.  But it is still hard to see the thousands of burned trees and chared hillsides where the flora and fauna once flourished.

Out of all that devastation, a creative artist and woodturner named Vinny Luciani at Hunter-Wolff Gallery has taken something so horrible and made something beautiful.  With salvaged Ponderosa Pine from the 2013 Black Forest fire, he makes lovely little tree ornaments.  His little trees include burned and unburned sections of the tree and are accented with crushed turquoise from one of Colorado’s turquoise mines in Cripple Creek.  These little jewels are a reminder of how quickly our natural resources can be devastated and how important it is to stay hopeful about the future.

We hope you have a safe summer and always return to find the home you love exactly the way you left it.  More information about Vinny Luciani’s Christmas tree ornaments can be found at our website or by calling 719-520-9494 during normal business hours.

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No-No Signs Not Here

April 21, 2014 in American Made,Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Teaching | Comments (0)

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Do NotDon’t you hate those signs in some stores that seem obvious? Do Not Touch;  You Break It, You Buy It; Checks with Proper ID Only; No Food, No Cameras; No Smoking; No Pets; No Cell Phones; No, No, No As a responsible adult, would you ever bring food into an art gallery or engage in a private conversation on your phone without considering those around you? Yes, some people do these things but it is a rare occurrence. Personally, I don’t need a sign to tell me how to behave and I believe my customers feel that way too. I understand why some retailers feel the need to display this type of signage but it just makes me want to leave their store.  How does it make you feel? 

As a business owner, my philosophy is to give people the benefit of the doubt and the opportunity to demonstrate that they are responsible adults accountable for their own actions. If someone decides to walk into my gallery with their four year old eating a drippy ice cream cone, then it is easy enough to politely ask the parent to come back when their youngster is done with his/her treat.  I prefer to address that small percentage of the population who display bad manners in a way that helps that person understand why they’re behavior is unacceptable. 

We enjoy visitors who bring their pets and children (without ice cream) and touch the touchables. Touching is a great way to learn and almost everything is waiting for you to explore it. Of course, we prefer visitors to  study the paintings with their eyes only. If visiting an art gallery is a new experience for your family and you are unsure what is acceptable, just ask if you can pick up something to admire it or ask if it is okay to bring your refreshment into the store with you.  We don’t operate like a museum or a library where there are strict rules. Visitors do not need to feel compelled to whisper either.  Hunter-Wolff Gallery and its staff are here to share information about everything we offer and want you to experience art first hand.  Often it takes both hands to experience what a burl feels like, for example.

Bring the dog, the kids and if possible, leave your cell in your pocket and let us help you learn about something new that could possibly change your life and give you new appreciation for art made by American artists–without a bunch of signs making you feel uptight.

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Are You An Art Junkie?

April 15, 2014 in American Made,Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Events,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Paintings,Shop Small,Small Business | Comments (0)

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PoppiesRecently, I spent an evening with a few friends at an event enjoying the NBA (No Boys Allowed), a walking tour of local shops.  Because I tend to be a workaholic, I knew it would be fun to get away from work, visiting my neighborhood small shops and meeting some other business owners.

What I did not expect was that I would be buying art. I really do not need more art, but I admit I am an Art Junkie.  Isn’t that an odd confession for an art dealer who has their own shop full of hundreds of art objects?  Plus, there is scarcely a spot for more paintings in my home. What’s an art junkie to do?

At my gallery, Hunter-Wolff Gallery, I represent 37 fine artists and there is always something coming in the door taunting me, calling my name.  But, like working in a chocolate factory where workers become immune to the smell of chocolate, I too can resist buying my gallery art every time I fall in love with a new arrival.  And, the truth is, I fall in love all the time.

What does this have to do with last evening?  It just goes to show that no matter how disciplined you are about spending and collecting, sometimes it just feels good to give in to ones cravings.  I’m glad I did.  Now when I walk by these paintings on my wall,  I see not only three delightful little oils but have a special memory of my friends and the nicest business owners in my neighborhood town. It was a great evening and I’ll cherish that night just as much as I cherish my new art.

It’s okay to be an art junkie!  If it makes you smile and helps you connect with humanity, go for it!

When was the last time you purchased a must-have painting, when you least expected it? How did it make you feel?

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Gallery Representation: A Strong Relationship

April 8, 2014 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Development,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Personal Development | Comments (0)

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WherepiritDaVinciAs an art gallery entrepreneur, artists frequently ask what I expect from an artist. Getting your foot in the door is one thing, but after representation is offered, the difficulty many artists have is staying on course with the gallery.  Too few artists understand that their long-term success in a gallery depends on one thing – “building a strong relationship”.

When two people come together, one business and one creative, the expectations need to be clear from the start for the relationship to thrive. Much like marriage where opposites attract, the relationship becomes an opportunity to learn from one another and appreciate each other’s strengths.  

Entrepreneurs assess opportunities and weigh the risks. They are planners and have financial goals. A new artist is a risk but their potential is important to the gallery’s goals.  Depending on the artist’s potential, the gallery determines how much time, money and display space to invest.  The artist gains an advantage when he/she comes to the table not only with potential but with commitment, personal goals, and core values that align with the gallery.

There isn’t anything more disappointing than having invested in an artist who decides to leave shortly after arrival because they decide to promote their work in a different way or do something else with their lives. Research also shows that the absentee artist and one-hit wonders are disappointments that make galleries cringe.  Galleries are also super cautious about artists who are capable, but show signs of limitations, are unreliable, change style frequently, or simply behave unprofessionally.

From a business perspective, I appreciate artists who have some knowledge of business and recognize what a successful business partnership involves. Those lacking business experience need to show a willingness to learn and accept the terms of their new relationship. Everyone values artists who understand their role in the partnership, even in times of hardship or adversity. The relationship can only blossom when players are cooperative.

After an artist lands a position in a gallery, he/she cannot assume everything is peachy because time has passed without major issues.  An artist needs to be attentive because the gallery is ALWAYS looking at the future if they want to be in the future.  Being a silent partner does not make a good partner.  Relationships will continue to advance when responsibility is shared. Communicate with your gallery and take time to ask how to make improvements. There are artists out there as qualified as you and ready to take your spot, and galleries are ALWAYS looking for opportunities to improve their future. 

Successful partners share prosperity and enjoy a rewarding, long-term relationship.  It’s not just about getting along, but showing mutual respect for what each brings to the table. Frequently gallery owners describe their ideal business relationships with artists like friendships. Personalities have to match. “It’s easy to love great art work but when personalities clash, a business relationship will never work.” It doesn’t have to be a love-fest but partners do have to get along and have respect for one another.

Here’s a few tips to keep your gallery happy and forge a relationship that will stand the test of time:

  • Become familiar with the gallery’s history, plans, and philosophy.
  • Get acquainted with all staff members and help educate your representatives about your technique and background.  Stories sell art!
  • Make promotion of your work easy for the gallery.  Provide quality images and full descriptions, videos, schedule live demonstrations, and keep up with the gallery’s social networks.
  • Stay engaged!  It only takes minutes to call or send a text message and keep communications open.
  • Be flexible about pricing and willing to work with the gallery to make sales. Do not let someone else’s advice convince you to increase your prices.  Trust your gallery; they have knowledge that can guide your strategic plans. An inappropriate price increase can push your prices too high resulting in lost sales. Be aware that it is far better to sell everything at reasonable prices than nothing at unreasonable prices.
  • Ask your gallery what they need for their clientele.  Never deliver new work without approval or push work that is not wanted.
  • Keep requests to a minimum and never make demands. Remember, you are not the business owner and the owner is responsible for the bottom-line.
  • Keep in contact without overdoing it.  Ask the gallery how often makes sense to “check-in” if you are unsure.  Some might want to communicate every week while other gallery owners are comfortable with once a month.

Stay positive and remember to recognize all the work your gallery does on your behalf. Send us tips that work for you too and they will  be shared in a follow-up post.

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Gallery Representation: Invited! Now What?

April 6, 2014 in Art,art education,Artists,Development,Hunter-Wolff Gallery | Comments (0)

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DonnaSharonHiFi2-1Congratulations, you have been invited to join other professional artists in an art gallery of your choosing! Now what? 

Now the hard work begins for you and the art gallery.  Working together your goal is to sell as much art as possible and to keep your new gallery family happy. After you signed your contract, delivered your body of work, and hi-fived, you probably thought, “I’ve done it!  I can go home and create artwork.”  Not so fast!  There’s a lot of work ahead; your job isn’t that simple.  Delivering work and waiting to collect your commissions is hardly a big step.  In fact, the big step is yet to come.

Building a strong business relationship is your most critical step and requires constant attention, commitment and desire. Rather than tell  artists how to build a relationship, I will share what Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s most successful artists do to keep the business relationship growing, the commission checks flowing and ensure long-term success.  It’s one of the most important lessons to being a successful artist. Your relationship with your gallery is a collaborative effort. The gallery  is your advocate so it is beneficial to build a strong relationship.  The top selling, highest in demand artists are the hardest working artists I know.  These artists are not only passionate and driven, they work long hours perfecting quality art  and never settling for mediocrity. They are planners, people with goals, have integrity, good communication (listening) skills, business acumen (open-minds),  good organizational skills, team players, and confidence. Aside from excellent creative skills, the one skill that stands out from the rest is business acumen.  They keep lines of communication open by taking the initiative to share information with their representatives — about what is planned and other relevant information.  They take the time to educate about their techniques and processes so information and value can be accurately shared with patrons.  They visit their representatives regularly to ensure gallery expectations are being met and needs are fulfilled.  They are honest with themselves, set egos aside, and change with economic and  market conditions. They ask how they can help.

A successful artist is accountable and takes action to correct issues when  warranted. They  manage their time,  creative energy and resources. They balance the time to produce art and to market it. They gather feedback to make better business decisions. Whether they enjoy the business aspects of the art world or not, they do those tasks responsibly to be a better team player. Successful artists are serious about business and understand how partnerships work and what benefits of collaboration are.  These are not artists who make demands but artists who delight in their shared success with business partners. They have learned the most important lesson:  with success comes responsibility!

To make a gallery-artist relationship strong and long lasting, is to understand the gallery’s role and accept the terms and conditions of your relationship. Hunter-Wolff Gallery offers consultative assistance. Take the next step to be a successful artist; call for availability 719-520-9494

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