Archive for the ‘Hunter-Wolff Gallery’ Category

Are You An Art Junkie?

April 15, 2014 in American Made,Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Events,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Paintings,Shop Small,Small Business | Comments (0)

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PoppiesRecently, I spent an evening with a few friends at an event enjoying the NBA (No Boys Allowed), a walking tour of local shops.  Because I tend to be a workaholic, I knew it would be fun to get away from work, visiting my neighborhood small shops and meeting some other business owners.

What I did not expect was that I would be buying art. I really do not need more art, but I admit I am an Art Junkie.  Isn’t that an odd confession for an art dealer who has their own shop full of hundreds of art objects?  Plus, there is scarcely a spot for more paintings in my home. What’s an art junkie to do?

At my gallery, Hunter-Wolff Gallery, I represent 37 fine artists and there is always something coming in the door taunting me, calling my name.  But, like working in a chocolate factory where workers become immune to the smell of chocolate, I too can resist buying my gallery art every time I fall in love with a new arrival.  And, the truth is, I fall in love all the time.

What does this have to do with last evening?  It just goes to show that no matter how disciplined you are about spending and collecting, sometimes it just feels good to give in to ones cravings.  I’m glad I did.  Now when I walk by these paintings on my wall,  I see not only three delightful little oils but have a special memory of my friends and the nicest business owners in my neighborhood town. It was a great evening and I’ll cherish that night just as much as I cherish my new art.

It’s okay to be an art junkie!  If it makes you smile and helps you connect with humanity, go for it!

When was the last time you purchased a must-have painting, when you least expected it? How did it make you feel?

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Gallery Representation: A Strong Relationship

April 8, 2014 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Development,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Personal Development | Comments (0)

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WherepiritDaVinciAs an art gallery entrepreneur, artists frequently ask what I expect from an artist. Getting your foot in the door is one thing, but after representation is offered, the difficulty many artists have is staying on course with the gallery.  Too few artists understand that their long-term success in a gallery depends on one thing – “building a strong relationship”.

When two people come together, one business and one creative, the expectations need to be clear from the start for the relationship to thrive. Much like marriage where opposites attract, the relationship becomes an opportunity to learn from one another and appreciate each other’s strengths.  

Entrepreneurs assess opportunities and weigh the risks. They are planners and have financial goals. A new artist is a risk but their potential is important to the gallery’s goals.  Depending on the artist’s potential, the gallery determines how much time, money and display space to invest.  The artist gains an advantage when he/she comes to the table not only with potential but with commitment, personal goals, and core values that align with the gallery.

There isn’t anything more disappointing than having invested in an artist who decides to leave shortly after arrival because they decide to promote their work in a different way or do something else with their lives. Research also shows that the absentee artist and one-hit wonders are disappointments that make galleries cringe.  Galleries are also super cautious about artists who are capable, but show signs of limitations, are unreliable, change style frequently, or simply behave unprofessionally.

From a business perspective, I appreciate artists who have some knowledge of business and recognize what a successful business partnership involves. Those lacking business experience need to show a willingness to learn and accept the terms of their new relationship. Everyone values artists who understand their role in the partnership, even in times of hardship or adversity. The relationship can only blossom when players are cooperative.

After an artist lands a position in a gallery, he/she cannot assume everything is peachy because time has passed without major issues.  An artist needs to be attentive because the gallery is ALWAYS looking at the future if they want to be in the future.  Being a silent partner does not make a good partner.  Relationships will continue to advance when responsibility is shared. Communicate with your gallery and take time to ask how to make improvements. There are artists out there as qualified as you and ready to take your spot, and galleries are ALWAYS looking for opportunities to improve their future. 

Successful partners share prosperity and enjoy a rewarding, long-term relationship.  It’s not just about getting along, but showing mutual respect for what each brings to the table. Frequently gallery owners describe their ideal business relationships with artists like friendships. Personalities have to match. “It’s easy to love great art work but when personalities clash, a business relationship will never work.” It doesn’t have to be a love-fest but partners do have to get along and have respect for one another.

Here’s a few tips to keep your gallery happy and forge a relationship that will stand the test of time:

  • Become familiar with the gallery’s history, plans, and philosophy.
  • Get acquainted with all staff members and help educate your representatives about your technique and background.  Stories sell art!
  • Make promotion of your work easy for the gallery.  Provide quality images and full descriptions, videos, schedule live demonstrations, and keep up with the gallery’s social networks.
  • Stay engaged!  It only takes minutes to call or send a text message and keep communications open.
  • Be flexible about pricing and willing to work with the gallery to make sales. Do not let someone else’s advice convince you to increase your prices.  Trust your gallery; they have knowledge that can guide your strategic plans. An inappropriate price increase can push your prices too high resulting in lost sales. Be aware that it is far better to sell everything at reasonable prices than nothing at unreasonable prices.
  • Ask your gallery what they need for their clientele.  Never deliver new work without approval or push work that is not wanted.
  • Keep requests to a minimum and never make demands. Remember, you are not the business owner and the owner is responsible for the bottom-line.
  • Keep in contact without overdoing it.  Ask the gallery how often makes sense to “check-in” if you are unsure.  Some might want to communicate every week while other gallery owners are comfortable with once a month.

Stay positive and remember to recognize all the work your gallery does on your behalf. Send us tips that work for you too and they will  be shared in a follow-up post.

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Gallery Representation: Invited! Now What?

April 6, 2014 in Art,art education,Artists,Development,Hunter-Wolff Gallery | Comments (0)

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DonnaSharonHiFi2-1Congratulations, you have been invited to join other professional artists in an art gallery of your choosing! Now what? 

Now the hard work begins for you and the art gallery.  Working together your goal is to sell as much art as possible and to keep your new gallery family happy. After you signed your contract, delivered your body of work, and hi-fived, you probably thought, “I’ve done it!  I can go home and create artwork.”  Not so fast!  There’s a lot of work ahead; your job isn’t that simple.  Delivering work and waiting to collect your commissions is hardly a big step.  In fact, the big step is yet to come.

Building a strong business relationship is your most critical step and requires constant attention, commitment and desire. Rather than tell  artists how to build a relationship, I will share what Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s most successful artists do to keep the business relationship growing, the commission checks flowing and ensure long-term success.  It’s one of the most important lessons to being a successful artist. Your relationship with your gallery is a collaborative effort. The gallery  is your advocate so it is beneficial to build a strong relationship.  The top selling, highest in demand artists are the hardest working artists I know.  These artists are not only passionate and driven, they work long hours perfecting quality art  and never settling for mediocrity. They are planners, people with goals, have integrity, good communication (listening) skills, business acumen (open-minds),  good organizational skills, team players, and confidence. Aside from excellent creative skills, the one skill that stands out from the rest is business acumen.  They keep lines of communication open by taking the initiative to share information with their representatives — about what is planned and other relevant information.  They take the time to educate about their techniques and processes so information and value can be accurately shared with patrons.  They visit their representatives regularly to ensure gallery expectations are being met and needs are fulfilled.  They are honest with themselves, set egos aside, and change with economic and  market conditions. They ask how they can help.

A successful artist is accountable and takes action to correct issues when  warranted. They  manage their time,  creative energy and resources. They balance the time to produce art and to market it. They gather feedback to make better business decisions. Whether they enjoy the business aspects of the art world or not, they do those tasks responsibly to be a better team player. Successful artists are serious about business and understand how partnerships work and what benefits of collaboration are.  These are not artists who make demands but artists who delight in their shared success with business partners. They have learned the most important lesson:  with success comes responsibility!

To make a gallery-artist relationship strong and long lasting, is to understand the gallery’s role and accept the terms and conditions of your relationship. Hunter-Wolff Gallery offers consultative assistance. Take the next step to be a successful artist; call for availability 719-520-9494

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Gallery Representation: Getting Your Foot In The Door

April 2, 2014 in Art Gallery,Artists,Development,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Personal Development,Teaching | Comments (0)

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HWGshowroomHow does an artist find the best gallery representation? … Not perfect but best?  Like any relationship, it will be more satisfying if you search for the best scenario and not expect perfection. As a gallery owner, I advise artists to think about finding a gallery like looking for a job.  It is more productive to identify a few potential galleries and determine if you are a good match, then working hard to make it happen. If you have a good body of work and are ready, take the next step to make contact.

Keep in mind before taking that step, however, that there will be a time when things don’t go exactly as planned. Like any career, if you work long enough you will experience some downs with the ups—and may have to endure a difficult boss (or gallery) for a brief period. But I believe that the majority of time, business dealings are positive and that goes for gallery relationships too. It is counterproductive to let a few bad experiences color your beliefs and attitudes about gallery relationships—especially those rumored.  Remember, dealing with an art gallery is a business relationship and it takes two to tango! As in all cases, there are always two sides to a story so don’t put much stock into the tales (gossip) from a third party.  Some people are very good at pointing fingers and blaming others when things don’t work out.

You will benefit by taking time to scope out a gallery quietly.  Visit their website, read their newsletters, attend their events, talk to their artists and visit to observe how the staff conducts business.  You will learn a ton of information just by observing.  You want the gallery to work for you and the gallery wants you to work for them. Would you work for a company that was short on integrity or had a poor reputation?  Of course not. Nor would a gallery want “to hire” someone without integrity or commitment. Make sure your prospects are a good fit and your art could benefit or contribute to the gallery. Don’t overlook the fact that a gallery has its own personality and it should fit with yours. Then call or write for a personal interview with the decision maker (gallery owner). If you can’t find information on the gallery’s website about how their submission process works, be sure to ask.  Never show up without an appointment.  Be respectful of the gallery’s business hours and the staff’s time.

To prepare for your interview, be sure to complete your due diligence ahead of time and stick to the schedule the gallery sets up for your meeting. Be professional, dress appropriately and take examples of your best work or portfolio.  The gallery will have a list of questions for you, so you too should be prepared with answers about your track record and your own questions about their processes and programs.

If and when you are invited to join a gallery, work hard to meet the gallery’s expectation and don’t forget to ask them “what can I do?” to help with sales and promotion.  Like any relationship, it takes two working together to achieve a long and rewarding experience.

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Art Class 101: Drawing

March 20, 2014 in Art,art education,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Teaching | Comments (0)

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IMG_1303Whether you are a beginner or an advanced artist, pay-as-you-go life drawing sessions allow you to develop or refine your  drawing skills. With a per-session limit of 5 attendees, these hands-on life drawing sessions allow you to draw faces and figures at your own pace and receive individual critique from the moderator. Hunter-Wolff Gallery provides the model and the moderator. You provide your own drawing supplies.

Every Wednesday classes are available in a relaxed setting to improve current skills or learn new skills. All you need is a sketch pad, a few soft pencils 2B, 4B, and 6B, an eraser and desire to build good foundation skills. Call 719-520-9494 to reserve your space.  Need evening classes, just ask!

Register by calling 719-520-9494 or emailing hunterwolffgallery@gmail.com and reserve your space at 2510 W. Colorado Avenue, Colorado Springs

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Lead the Way to LayAway

March 17, 2014 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Clifford T. Bailey,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Oils,Old Colorado City,Paintings,Pottery,Shop Small,Small Business | Comments (0)

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Piggy-Bank1How many times have you returned to purchase a special piece of art days after you first saw it and it was gone? Not only are you disappointed, but the staff at Hunter-Wolff Gallery too is disappointed that you missed out. When you don’t want to use a credit card and you don’t have the cash on hand for your art purchase, consider using Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s layaway plan. It’s a great option and it doesn’t cost anything extra.

When you buy an item on credit, you take the merchandise home with you but then you are likely to pay a premium to your credit card holder while you make installment payments. When you use our  layaway, however, you agree to a non-refundable deposit equal to a percentage of the purchase price and pay over time at no extra charge. How great is that?

Because we want you to own the art you love, we never add a handling fee or any up-charge to your layaway. We do remove the item from the sales floor and it remains in storage reserved for you until the final payment is made.

We get it that being in debt  is a dumb idea.  That is why we started offering layaway almost nine years ago and many collectors can attest to collecting using our layaway plan without upsetting their household budget. We are big fans of the Dave Ramsey philosophy “Cash is King; Debt is Dumb!” and understand why you may not want to charge a purchase.

By the way, there isn’t a small business that I know who doesn’t prefer cash.  Cash sales save small businesses money and helps keep operating costs low.   So when you get the chance, use cash and help your local small businesses thrive and grow without adding increases to your purchases. Did you really think all those credit card rewards came free?

Remember: the Hunter-Wolff Gallery  layaway purchase plan is not limited to in-store purchases. We also offer layaway options for items that clients find on our website or Facebook. Our goal is to help you acquire the artwork that you love without causing financial stress.  Layaway is easy; start with a down payment and make regular weekly or monthly payments and before you know it, you will own beautiful original artwork.  Now lets start talking about the art you love!

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Spring Into Art

March 15, 2014 in American Made,Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Color,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,jewelry,Justin Clements oils,Oils,Paintings,Pottery | Comments (0)

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Tired of winter and sub-zero temps?  Us too!  In a few days we can officially think Spring!   At Hunter-Wolff Gallery, Spring means an acceleration of activity to freshen up the gallery  and add new inviting artwork. When you visit, you will enjoy new work  by David Ridge, Fred Lunger, Katherine McNeill, Justin Clements and more. Our display cases are bursting with delicate, eye-catching druzy necklaces along with spring colored stones in pea-pod green mixed with blue glass, and the bluest of blue Murano glass jewelry  with other springy colors by a variety of jewelry designers.  Hunter-Wolff Gallery now has an influx of beautiful pottery by Tony Heslop. The icing on the cake is Justin Clements new collection of still life beauties and landscapes.  He is also one of the featured artists in American Art Collector (March 2014).  The images selected for the article are of original oils available only at Hunter-Wolff Gallery.

For those who are collectors of art, seasoned or just getting started, don’t miss an opportunity to add Justin Clements oils to your collection.  He is  a young painter with an old soul and amazing gift.  His prices are inviting and we expect his work to be increasing in value over time.  While enjoying the great weather coming your way and the splendor of spring, take time to visit Hunter-Wolff Gallery and let us know what catches your eye.  We love to  hear how our spring collection gets your attention.

 

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Vote Hunter-Wolff Gallery Colorado Springs Best Art Gallery

January 11, 2014 in Art,Art Gallery,Art Studies,Artists,Award,Best of the Springs,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City,Paintings,Vote | Comments (0)

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It’s that time of year again! The Colorado Springs Gazette just announced its 20th Annual Best of the Springs campaign.

Every person who votes in five or more categories will be entered to win a grand prize equal to a $500 value.

VOTE NOW through FEBRUARY 16.

What’s great about voting early is that you will have time to get your friends to vote too before the deadline.

Hunter-Wolff Gallery wants your vote for Best Gallery!

Vote

 

Why vote Hunter-Wolff Gallery Colorado Springs Best Gallery?  Because Hunter-Wolff Gallery meets important criteria and high standards. First, it is a Colorado Springs gallery within the city limits, established and focused on meeting its patron’s expectations for quality art since 2005.  Hunter-Wolff Gallery is a gallery, not a museum, not a gift shop, and not a hybrid gallery.  The artists and staff at Hunter-Wolff Gallery are seasoned professionals, knowledgeable and passionate about visual arts.  No other single gallery since 2005 has been more influencial in bringing the arts alive in Colorado Springs through ArtWalk than Hunter-Wolff Gallery.  No other gallery is on a mission like Hunter-Wolff Gallery to raise the level of awareness about art in its community. No other gallery is more dedicated to practicing its core values every day to insure its high standards and client satisfaction.  Hunter-Wolff Gallery is proud of its successes and knows it isn’t possible to achieve its goals without the vote of its customers everyday — not just one time a year during special campaigns.  Your vote goes along way to show Hunter-Wolff Gallery that you appreciate what they do throughout the year like thousands of other fans.

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Christmas is Almost Here and You Still Need Ideas!

December 12, 2013 in American Made,Art,Art Gallery,Art Glass,Clifford T. Bailey,Color,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,jewelry,Jewelry by Tana,Justin Clements oils,Marlene Kort,Miniature oils,Oils,Old Colorado City,Paintings,Pottery,Raku | Comments (0)

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christmas-treeEvery year Christmas seems to come faster than the year before and every year it seems to be harder to think of new ideas.  Are you struggling with balancing your budget and finding a gift that doesn’t look like it came from the local pharmacy?If socks and ties and drug store cologne aren’t working for you, good! Start thinking about unique gifts that show you care.  At Hunter-Wolff Gallery, we help clients every day purchase affordable gifts for weddings, anniversaries, birthdays, and the holidays.  We listen and understand that you are feeling a little stressed as we get closer to Christmas and you really don’t want to disappoint those who are so important to you. Here are a few ideas on some items available at different price points:

Under $100 for Her or Him

  1. Hand-blown glass hearts by Donna Gordon, starting at $65
  2. Hand-blown “paper weights” in tear-drop form by Donna Gordon, starting at $40
  3. Vases, Platters, and other functional pottery by Tony Heslop, starting under $20
  4. Jewelry by four different designers, starting under $30
  5. Decorative raku by Mark Wong, starting at $35
  6. Decorative/functional clayware and glass bowls, plates, and other tableware by Kerry Brooks, starting at $35
  7. Lamps and raku vessels in a variety of glazes by Tony Heslop, starting at $35

$100-$500 for Her or Him

  1. Wood turned vessels and bowls (he will love!), starting at $150
  2. Blown glass  plates, vases, and more by Donna Gordon, starting at $140
  3. Oil and pastel paintings beautifully framed by multiple artists, starting at $145
  4. Whimsical flying Texas-Longs with Bunnies by Madalyn Kae, starting at $225
  5. Unique raku Glow Pots by Marc Jenesel, starting at $335
  6. Blown glass by Jennifer Nauck starting at $400
  7. Beautiful pendants and bracelets, starting at $95

Just let us know your budget and we promise to keep you on track, save you time by gift wrapping, and keeping everyone’s blood pressure where it should be!   Check our website at www.hunterwolffgallery.com or call for immediate help: 719-520-9494. Happy Holidays!  Happy Shopping!

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BurrrrrrrL

December 4, 2013 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City | Comments (0)

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IMG_0181No, Burl doesn’t have anything to do with being cold. It is all about beautiful wood. Some new burl aspen vessels by Jerry Wedekind are arriving in time for holiday shopping. We get so many questions about the type of wood and what exactly burl means it was time to give you a little explanation. A burl is a tree growth or by-product of environmental- or human-caused stress in which the grain has grown in a deformed manner.

Some are in the form of a rounded outgrowth on a tree trunk or branch filled with small knots from dormant buds. Burls can also grow beneath the ground attached to the roots and discovered when the tree dies or falls over. In some tree species, burls can grow to enormous size adding to the challenge and expense of removing the burl from its natural habitat to the woodworker’s studio.

For artists like Jerry Wedekind, Elmer Jacobs and Vinny Luciani at Hunter-Wolff Gallery, burls yield a very peculiar and figured wood that are highly prized for interesting patterns and rich color. The low occurrence rate of burls adds to their value and collectability.

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Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s three wood-turners covet burls for their beauty, but the art of creating with them requires patience and special skills. Burl wood is very hard to work in a lathe or with hand tools because its grain is not straight but misshapen. The highly desirable irregular patterns of burl wood make it harder to saw, chisel, and cut without splitting the wood or accidentally cutting it in the wrong direction.

Stop in soon and let us tell you more about this incredibly beautiful wood!

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