Archive for May, 2015

Change Your Status Quo With Art

May 19, 2015 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Children,Fine Art,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Janelle Cox,Oils,Old Colorado City,Paintings | Comments (0)

A Mother's Love 18x18(1)

Janelle Cox is Never Satisfied with The Status Quo and always brings new subject matter and fresh ideas to her canvas

 

How do you change status quo to get the most out of life? Do you look for new challenges? New adventures? Push the envelope a little?

In a recent conversation with a local Artist, he reminded me that he knows he isn’t improving or growing as an artist unless he brings new ideas to the forefront by challenging himself. He feels he isn’t doing his best work unless he sees improvement and the status quo never works for him. Ever.

In 1991, Ronald Regan said, “Status quo, you know, that is Latin for ‘the mess we’re in’.” If you don’t really like the “mess” you’re in, change it. Don’t settle for status quo.

I believe we all have the power to make change, to challenge ourselves, to improve our current state of affairs.  I like to believe that collecting art is part of that process.  It enriches our lives.  It makes us see the world with different eyes and feel a closer connection to world we live in.  Art transfers positive energy to our personal lives.

Case in point: After returning from being away for a period, I experienced with fresh eyes what visitors see when they walk through Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s door. It was reassuring to feel a much needed escape from the status quo and so much positive charge among our collections. I couldn’t have been more pleased to see new artwork that arrived while I as gone by Greg Custer, Janelle Cox, Fred Lunger and other dedicated artists.

It was a wonderful reminder that HWG continues to offer what is important and needed in our lives to stay uplifted and positive about the future. Stop in soon and see the new work now hanging by these fine artists–work that is always charged with energy, aesthetically appealing with a fresh contemporary flair and the perfect antidote for the status quo.

Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow ~ Albert Einstein

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Tiny Homes, Tiny Art

May 12, 2015 in American Made,Art,Art Gallery,Artists,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Miniature oils | Comments (0)

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FL026a

Miniature Bronze Pike

Recently one of my kids asked my opinion about tiny homes on wheels, where the entire house is several hundred square feet (or less).  I started laughing because I can’t seem to find enough room in my current home, which is substantially larger, for all my art.  I am an art lover afterall and need space to enjoy it.

The small house movement (also known as the “tiny house movement”) is a popular description for the architectural and social movement that advocates living simply in small homes. I love the idea but am not sure it works for me personally at this point in my life.  For most art collectors this type of living could pose a problem, especially if you are an active collector and adding new works of art to your collection–to your living space.

One solution for the tiny home dweller is to continue to collect but go for those collectibles that are miniatures or smaller than the norm. For example Fred Lunger, a bronze sculptor at Hunter-Wolff Gallery, sculpts miniature bronzes that are typically between 2 inches and 5 inches in height or width. With miniatures, you often have a “miniature” price tag too!  Hunter-Wolff Gallery has many options for ideal “small” art for those with limited space and  want to continue collecting. Call 719-520-9494 or visit www.hunterwolffgallery.com for help with original art for your space.

 

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Collecting Art: A Journey of Tiny Steps

May 7, 2015 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Oils,Personal Development | Comments (0)

GalleryJanelleMy adult children often quote their Dad who wisely pointed out, “Life is a journey, not a destination.”  — one of his favorite quotes from Ralph Waldo Emerson. He would urge our children and friends to enjoy life’s journey regardless of outcome even when they experienced a disappointment.

Collecting art is a journey too.  Sometimes we are afraid of what we don’t know and don’t trust our instincts.  As an art collector and gallery owner, I have often seen the look in someone’s eyes, even tears, when a special work of art triggers an emotion. But too often they walk away empty handed because of their lack of experience or understanding of a particular art form. They fail to experience the wonderful gift of art as part of their personal journey.

Like anything one does in life, it is important to be confident and trust ones instincts when considering  art.  A meaningful work of art in our life adds a new dimension to the person we can be.  It connects us to the world we live in similar to other art forms such as a beautiful song or memorable stage performance or award-winning literature. These experiences make us who we are, a more fulfilled and interesting being.
How often have you purchased tickets for a show and walked out disappointed?  Started a book everyone raved about, and put it down out of boredom? You might even purchase a piece of art that you are less than enchanted with later, but does that mean that you can’t enjoy art … or read another book or go to another performance?   Taking tiny steps, on your journey of life, allows you to grow and  smell the roses along the way. As you get more confident with your own tastes and spend a little time exploring what types of art speak to you, you will find the perfect gem to make your life sweeter.
Start today. Take a step toward the journey of collecting.  It is fascinating and exciting. In closing, I share another Emerson quote that happens to be one of my favorites:  “It is not the length of life, but the depth.” Ralph Waldo Emerson
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How To: Secure Gallery Representation

May 1, 2015 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Artists,Hunter-Wolff Gallery | Comments (0)

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handshake2The decision to approach a gallery for representation is followed by hard work and too often 7 common mistakes. Making these mistakes can create disappointment, waste time, impede financial opportunity and, more importantly, could permanently hurt the chance to secure the best representation for your work.

These few steps can increase chances for representation with a gallery. It may be surprising how many doors will open when following some simple guidelines.  Just like applying for any job in the marketplace, one needs to be prepared and follow common etiquette. Don’t fall short on these areas:

  1. Appointment – First, visit a gallery in person. Study as much as possible about the gallery from their website or speak with some of the resident artists. Set up an appointment with the owner or hiring manager for discussion purposes. Never show up without an appointment if you want to be taken seriously.
  2. Follow-Up – Timing is always a factor. Follow-up with a second call if you are not successful the first time. After a call or meeting with a gallery, regardless of the outcome, be courteous and follow-up with a thank you for their time, words of encouragement or anything else that you took away from your meeting. Don’t be shy about asking if you can follow-up with the gallery in 3-6 months if you think it is a good match but maybe the timing is not right. It may not turnout the way you want but following up later may be the perfect time to be invited back.
  3. Answers – Like any job interview, be prepared to answer questions about your track record and demonstrate you are a reliable artist who is prepared to deliver what the gallery needs when they need it. They will want to know about your experience, sales history and commitment. Be ready to discuss how you might contribute to their bottom-line.
  4. Portfolio – Leave your work at home or in your car until you are asked for it. Deliver a portfolio of images of your best work and formatted in a binder and on a CD. The CD will be appreciated by the busy gallery owner. Label each image with a title, size, and medium and format large enough (4×5) to be clearly viewed. Busy galleries don’t have time to look at your life’s work; 15 examples are sufficient to determine a good fit. Keep it concise, consistent, informative and relevant and make it easy for review.
  5. Consistency – Each portfolio should exhibit a meaningful body of work. Illustrate your uniqueness, technique, style, and appeal, but be consistent. If you are an oil painter and excel at landscapes, showing pencil sketches of nudes or abstract watercolors because you enjoy that too aren’t necessarily helpful. Show only your most recent body of work and your best work. Include sold work to show you have a track record. Artists who work in different mediums should develop a portfolio based on one medium only. Create multiple portfolios but format each as a series of work based on only one medium. Be consistent–don’t confuse the gallery with your different styles and different mediums.
  6. Inventory – An artist with half a dozen pieces of work isn’t likely to be accepted into an active gallery. A viable partnership starts with a volume of work that allows galleries to swap out or replace work on a moment’s notice. Many successful artists have as many as 75 or more pieces in their inventory and are constantly creating fresh work. The gallery can’t sell what you don’t have. If you only create a few pieces a month, you may not be ready for a gallery relationship.
  7. Self-Esteem –  Successful artists are confident in their artistic ability, marketability and the salability of their work. If you have a positive attitude, high self-esteem and confidence in your work, you will have a better chance to advance beyond your first meeting.

Lastly, for artists with a special talent, getting a foot in the gallery door should be the easiest step to an exciting career. There are many circumstances that may prevent an invitation initially; such as, timing, space availability, genre fit, etc. An unprepared artist, however, can turn a perfect opportunity into a disappointment. There is no short-cut to securing good representation. But, the artist who prepares has the best chance of enjoying a long and rewarding relationship with the best representatives for their work.

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