Archive for July, 2016

Why Art?

July 29, 2016 in Art | Comments (0)

Understanding why art is important in our lives, isn’t always clear. But those who appreciate art know the value of originality and have their own version of what purpose art serves society.
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If you want to start an interesting conversation, just ask someone what they think the purpose art serves. There are dozens of books written, blogs posted, and articles released about this subject. Even art educators address this subject in classrooms. Since the first cave man etched in stone, man has used the power of art for purposes beyond creativity, self-expression, and communication. Sometimes it is easier to understand the purpose of art by considering what it is not.
One aspect about art is that it does not discriminate. It allows even young children who have a limited vocabulary to express themselves without words and doesn’t care about ones education, successes, religion, color, sexual preferences or how much money you make. It is there for anyone to engage in, using ones own abilities and for anyone to enjoy. It can serve as therapy and for healing broken lives. Art affects us all in different ways and only you know its value. Through art, we can learn the meaning of the joy of work too. Creating art is work, like any other profession and the idea of good work, personal fulfillment and recognition serves our society favorably. Work is one of the noblest expressions of the human spirit, and art is the visible evidence of work carried to the highest possible level. Art is the best way to learn the value of work and appreciate
workmanship. It is impossible to experience art without experiencing values of home and family, work and play, the individual and community, nature and the environment, war and peace, beauty and ugliness, pain and love.
Hunter-Wolff Gallery brings you art that you can experience and value in your own special way. We look forward to hearing what you think the purpose of art is in your own life.

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Varnish: Final Steps

July 23, 2016 in Art,Art Gallery,Fine Art,Oils,Paintings | Comments (0)

varnish a paintingDid you know Artists varnish their paintings as a final step for long-term protection and years of enjoyment by the collector?  The final step to completing a painting after it has thoroughly dried is the protective application: varnish. Just like finishing furniture, a varnish product  is applied to paintings that are not going to be framed under glass to protect them from dirt, dust, and pollution in the environment. Varnish also homogenizes the appearance of a painting, evening it out for a finished look. Depending on the artist’s decision, glossy or matte finishes or something in between can be chosen.
Varnishes are applied either with a brush or from a spray can. Gloss varnishes dry completely clear, but a matte (satin) varnish leaves an ever-so-slight frosted-glass appearance. Because of the effects of a matte finish, some artists opt for the glossier look to enhance the finer details of their painting.
Painters also have the option of using removable varnishes so that it can, at some future date if it has discolored, be removed easily and replaced without damaging the painting. The final step in varnishing a painting is done after the oils have cured which can take anywhere from six to twelve months depending on environmental conditions. Delaying the application of a varnish ensures the application is less likely to crack. Some artists prefer a matte varnish, where they can apply a gloss coat first to seal the surface before a matte or satin varnish is applied. This improves the clarity of the final finish whether it is a gloss or matte. Many artists put their work on the market for sale before they are able to complete the varnishing step. The buyer may request that the varnish be applied after 12 months or more to ensure the paint has fully cured for future protection.
At Hunter-Wolff Gallery we suggest buyers inquire whether their painting purchases have been varnished and if they can be varnished at a later day if it they have not yet fully cured.  Happy Art Collecting!

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