Posts Tagged ‘Aspen Burl’

From Colorado’s Back Country to Your Front Door

December 30, 2014 in American Made,Art,Colorado,Old Colorado City,trees | Comments (0)

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Two-Tiered Juniper Table by Jerry Wedekind

Two-Tiered Juniper Table by Jerry Wedekind

This time of the year, are you planted in front of your TV or snuggled up with a good book in front the fire? Sounds comfortable, doesn’t it? Unlike those of us who prefer the comforts of home when the temperatures dip below freezing, Jerry Wedekind is one of those rare beings who would prefer the outdoors over the indoors anytime of the year.

He is a real outdoorsman with a special gift.  He loves the wilderness and scours Colorado back country for his greatest love – “the finest aged wood” to create breathtaking hollow turned burl vessels and artistically twisted juniper for tables and benches.  Real sculptural pieces of art!

It only takes about 15 seconds of listening to Jerry to learn how serious he is about his craft. Not many artists go to the extremes Jerry does to produce handcrafted art made from aspen, juniper and other beautiful Colorado wood. He often takes flight in a small aircraft, searching like an eagle in the sky, to locate rare and unusual burls—which from the sky look like a black target against the white aspen bark and snow covered ground. Using his GPS, he records the location of each potential piece to collect after the snow melts.

Aspen Burl Vessel by Jerry Wedekind

Aspen Burl Vessel by Jerry Wedekind

When he’s not turning objects in his shop, Jerry is hiking or mountain biking to collect potential wood he can’t visually identify from the sky. He says, “When I’m on a trail, I have one eye on the trail and the other fixed upon the surrounding landscape in a constant quest for the raw materials I need for my turnings and tables.”  Maybe it only takes one good eye for Jerry, but I think he just has a sixth sense about these things since he has been doing it for years.  Stop in and see (with both your eyes) these beautiful burl vessels and juniper tables.

You are a click away from more work by Jerry. More details about Jerry in a previously published article, February 2013, titled “Hardship Builds Character”.

 

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BurrrrrrrL

December 4, 2013 in Art,art education,Art Gallery,Colorado,Hunter-Wolff Gallery,Old Colorado City | Comments (0)

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IMG_0181No, Burl doesn’t have anything to do with being cold. It is all about beautiful wood. Some new burl aspen vessels by Jerry Wedekind are arriving in time for holiday shopping. We get so many questions about the type of wood and what exactly burl means it was time to give you a little explanation. A burl is a tree growth or by-product of environmental- or human-caused stress in which the grain has grown in a deformed manner.

Some are in the form of a rounded outgrowth on a tree trunk or branch filled with small knots from dormant buds. Burls can also grow beneath the ground attached to the roots and discovered when the tree dies or falls over. In some tree species, burls can grow to enormous size adding to the challenge and expense of removing the burl from its natural habitat to the woodworker’s studio.

For artists like Jerry Wedekind, Elmer Jacobs and Vinny Luciani at Hunter-Wolff Gallery, burls yield a very peculiar and figured wood that are highly prized for interesting patterns and rich color. The low occurrence rate of burls adds to their value and collectability.

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Hunter-Wolff Gallery’s three wood-turners covet burls for their beauty, but the art of creating with them requires patience and special skills. Burl wood is very hard to work in a lathe or with hand tools because its grain is not straight but misshapen. The highly desirable irregular patterns of burl wood make it harder to saw, chisel, and cut without splitting the wood or accidentally cutting it in the wrong direction.

Stop in soon and let us tell you more about this incredibly beautiful wood!

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